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Nurse Warrior

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Hope Williamson, a U.S. Army major and recent graduate of the Doctor of Nursing Practice program, recently departed for her third tour of duty in Afghanistan, where she will use her newly acquired skills to care for injured soldiers on the battlefield.

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Self-proclaimed “nurse warrior” Hope Williamson is a fighter in every sense of the word. A major in the U.S. Army and an active duty nurse who trains medics, nurses and doctors before being deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan, she walks the earth
bearing instruments of defense and healing.

“In the combat zone, I wear a firearm on my side and never forget that I am a soldier first. I am prepared to do whatever is needed to protect my team and country, but at the same time I am committed to saving lives,” saysWilliamson, who worked at the U.S. Army Trauma Training Center located at the Ryder Trauma Center in Jackson Memorial Hospital until late last summer, when she departed for her third tour of duty in the Middle East.

Williamson entered the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program at the School of Nursing and Health Hope Williamson, a U.S. Army major and recent graduate of the Doctor of Nursing Practice program, recently departed for her third tour of duty in Afghanistan, where she will use her newly acquired skills to care for injured soldiers on the battlefield. Nurse Warrior Studies after her first tour in Iraq to enhance her trauma and advanced patient skills but also gained valuable leadership tools. She graduated last August, and like her trainees at Jackson, the experience prepared her further for the rigors of active duty.

“The education I received at the School of Nursing and Health Studies will be applied daily to patient care in the battlefield in Afghanistan and Iraq,” says Williamson, currently assigned as the clinical head nurse of the Emergency Medical Treatment Section in Baghdad, Iraq.

“I learned the true meaning of evidenced-based practice and leadership and will apply these new skills to provide more compassionate care for our men and women critically injured in combat,” she says.

Williamson is already making a global difference. The American Journal of Disaster Medicine recently accepted her manuscript on CBRNE chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosives) Disaster Management Protocols for publication, citing her work as both well written and clinically sound.

A resident of Sacramento, California, Williamson comes from a military family—her father is retired from the Air Force, one brother is in the Marines and three sisters joined the Army—her dedication to our country comes as second nature.

She says she has no regrets about her decision to head back to Afghanistan. Williamson considers her work a higher calling.

“I am doing exactly what I need to be doing,” Williamson says. “If I do not bring these skills back to the medics in the field, people will die.”


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