Untitled Document

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Da Vinci Program (DVP) in the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) aims to enhance the opportunities for incoming freshman and sophomore students to explore the interdisciplinary connections among the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Incoming students invited to participate in DVP possess a minimum combined (math & reading) score of 1400 on the SAT or 32 on the ACT, along with significant academic achievements in high school.

The Da Vinci Program encourages students to rethink the map of human knowledge. It emphasizes connections between humanistic and scientific inquiry and their modes of understanding: objectivity, critical analysis, self-reflexivity, the nature of proof, authority, and the logic and rhetoric of written expression. It also helps define the distinctive elements that humanities classes can offer to STEM-minded students: a chance to reflect on questions of human values, ethics, and aesthetics. At the same time, it introduces humanities students to conceptually new means of investigating the traditional fields.

WHAT'S IN A NAME?
One might wonder why this new Program is named after Leonardo Da Vinci (1452-1519). It is not a mere marketing ploy, as it reflects the inspiration that the faculty involved in this project draw from an iconic figure who, at the onset of modernity, was a "natural philosopher" (in the language of the time), an engineer, an architect, a keen observer and sketcher of fellow human beings, a painter, a sculptor, an inventor, a chemist, a physicist, and more. At a time when disciplinary boundaries had not solidified, his interests ranged freely across fields, and thus his ideas were cross-fertilized in creative and exciting ways—not to mention that his achievements are an enduring signpost in world culture, something we wish we could foster in the students participating in this program.

More info:
► RSVP/Accept invitation to Da Vinci
► Program Features
► Program of Study
► Sample Courses
► Contact


RSVP/Accept Invitation to Da Vinci
Please note that only 25 students will be accepted into this program. RSVP's will be taken on a first come, first serve basis until the program is full.

Required questions are marked with an (*).

* First Name * Last Name
 
UM ID (ex: C02013196)
 
* E-mail Address
 
   
Please review our privacy statement relating to information we collect, choice/opt-out, and correction/updating of personal information before proceeding.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

PROGRAM FEATURES:

► A minimum combined (math & reading) score of 1400 on the SAT or 32 on the ACT, along with significant      academic achievements in high school.
► Waivers of CAS general education requirements.
► Chance to be part of a unique intellectual and social cohort, shared social and intellectual activities, shared      travel/study abroad.
► Funding for study that includes travel (optional)
► Inclusion of program participation on transcript and diploma upon graduation and personalized faculty advising for      medical school, law school, and PhD programs—faculty program facilitator supervises student advising
► Most students will end up majoring in one science department/interdisciplinary program and one humanities      department/interdisciplinary program.
► Students take one Da Vinci class each semester in their first three years.
► Emphasis on global and international questions. Students are encouraged to take classes that involve study and      travel: e.g. a class on the literature of London that would involve spring break travel to the city; a class on Chinese      history and culture that involved a ten-day study trip at the end of spring semester. Possibility of enrolling in      UGalapagos for one semester of the sophomore year.
► To the fullest extent possible, Da Vinci take classes and are advised by full-time, tenure-line faculty.
► The program draws on existing interdisciplinary strengths at UM: the Leonard and Jayne Abess Center for      Ecosystem Science and Policy; the Neuroscience Program; Africana Studies; American Studies; Women's and      Gender Studies; Latin American Studies.

Back to Top ▲


PROGRAM OF STUDY:
Freshman Year - Fall Semester
Freshman Year – Spring Semester
 

Leonardo da Vinci Course
The first course for da Vinci Program Students in Fall 2013 examines the historical figure of Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) as a case study of a person whose interests encompassed different areas of knowledge. Known as a painter, anatomist, engineer, architect, musician, stage set designer, mathematician, inventor, and much more, Leonardo seems to incarnate “Renaissance Man.” How was it possible for him to pursue so many interests during his life time? Among our goals:

● acquainting ourselves with the life trajectory,    experience, and myths surrounding Leonardo;
● exploring the educational and training system in    place in the Renaissance;
● discovering how “modern” disciplines separate    activities that in the past were much more closely    connected;
● discovering how such separations can be    questioned and bridged.


The Circle of Knowledge
● Guest faculty will contribute from various disciplines.

 

History and Philosophy of Science Course
● Guest Faculty will contribute from various disciplines.



Sophomore Year – Fall Semester
Sophomore Year – Spring Semester
Science and Society or Art Science Course
  A research/class project involving either a photo lab/visual media project or research in digital humanities.

Center for the Humanities SymposiumStudents participate in a 2-day symposium organized by the Center for the Humanities.


Junior Year – Fall Semester
Junior Year – Spring Semester

DVS Program co-listed sections of regular course offerings, with an emphasis on interdisciplinary classes.

Examples: history of science; medicine and literature.

Topic-Based Seminar #1
Choose from a list of 5-6 seminars
Topics include a major contemporary ethical, intellectual, and aesthetic question:
Examples:
The Science and Poetry of Environmental Change; Medicine, Healing, and Religion.

 

DVS Program co-listed sections of regular course offerings, with an emphasis on interdisciplinary classes

Examples: history of science; medicine and literature.

Topic-Based Seminar #2
Choose from a list of 5-6 seminars
Topics include a major contemporary ethical, intellectual, and aesthetic question: Examples: The Science and Poetry of Environmental Change; Medicine, Healing, and Religion.



Senior Year – Fall Semester
Senior Year – Spring Semester

DVS Symposium

 DVS students present on an interdisciplinary issue or question at a symposium open to the public.
 

DVS Symposium

 DVS students present on an interdisciplinary issue or question at a symposium open to the public.

Back to Top ▲




   

ARC 121 Architecture and Culture
ARC 223 Architecture and the Environment
ARC 230 Building technology
ARC 372 Ancient Architecture
ARC 390 History of Cities
AMS 301 Race and Ethnic Relations
APY 201 Principles of Archaeology
APY 361 Gender and Language
APY 386 Psychological Anthropology
APY 392 Sex and Culture
ARH 333 Roman Art
ARH 337 Italian Renaissance Art
BIL 372 Readings in Biology
BIL 374 Tools for Creative Thinking
BIL 375 Animal Behavior
BIL 385 Special Topics in Biology--Conservation and Protected Areas
BSL 460 Healthcare Law & Ethics
CHM 317 The Chemistry of Food and Taste
CLA 220 Greek and Roman Mythology
CLA 241 Greek Civilization
CVJ 419 Interactive Storytelling
ECS 372 Special Topics in ECS: Environmental Filmmaking and Community Engagement
ECS 372 Special Topics in ECS: Reporting Global Environmental Issues
ENG 210 Literary Themes and Topics: Literature & Medicine
ENG 210 Literary Themes and Topics: War And The Fashioning Of Gender
ENG 306 Advanced Composition: Nature Writing
GEG 201 Topics in Geography
GRE 101 Elementary Ancient Greek
HIS 223 Medicine and Society
HIS 254 History of the Cold War in America: Revolution, Nation, Empire: Cold War in the Americas
HIS 315 Imperial China
HIS 391 History of Everyday Life
INS 410 Global Perspectives of Race: Race in a Global Perspective
JUS 231 Jewish Civilization
LAS 301 Interdisciplinary Topics in Latin American and Caribbean Studies: Gender and Development
LAS 320 Interdisciplinary Topics in Latin American and Caribbean Studies: Latin America and the Environment
LAT 101 Elementary Latin I
PHI 271 Ancient Philosophy
PHI 333 Biomedical Ethics
PHI 349 Philosophy of Space & Time
PHI 352 Aesthetics
POL 499 Special Topics: Government Accountability, Informational Technologies & Personal Responsibility
REL 101 Religion & Moral Choice
REL 360 Religion & Bioethics
SOC 301 Social Organization
SOC 383 Sociology of Education
WGS 310 Popular representations of Queer sexualities
WGS 315 Gender, Race, Class
WGS 350 Special Topics in WGS: Current


Back to Top ▲


CONTACT
Questions about the Da Vinci Scholars Program?
Contact Maria Stampino at mgstampino@umail.miami.edu.