WirelessCanes FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions regarding WirelessCanes
 

1. What is WirelessCanes?

2. How do I get on WirelessCanes?

3. How do I know where WirelessCanes is available in the Coral Gables campus?

4. Why should I use WirelessCanes?

5. When should I use CaneNet instead of WirelessCanes?

6. How secure is WirelessCanes?

7. How fast is WirelessCanes?

8. Will my PDA (Personal Digital Assistant) work on WirelessCanes?

9. Is there are recommended wireless network card?

10. How do visitors to UM access the WirelessCanes network?

11. I can not connect to WirelessCanes. What is wrong?

12. My connection to WirelessCanes starts out fine, then starts to give me trouble. What is wrong?

 

1. What is WirelessCanes?

WirelessCanes is the University of Miami's 802.11 wireless network in the Coral Gables campus.  This service provides faculty, staff and students with mobile computers (laptops or PDAs) network access to the Internet and UM campus network without using a wired Ethernet connection.  Wireless connectivity is also available at the Miller School of Medicine and at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science.

2. How do I get on WirelessCanes

Please click here to learn to register for WirelessCanes.

3. How do I know where WirelessCanes is available in the Coral Gables campus?

You may click here for the map of the wireless cloud.

4. Why should I use WirelessCanes?

WirelessCanes allows students with mobile computers (laptops and PDAs) to surf the Internet almost anywhere in the Coral Gables campus without using a wired Ethernet connection.

5. When should I use CaneNet instead of WirelessCanes?

WirelessCanes is a shared resource that is meant to complement, not replace, the wired Ethernet infrastructure in the residential colleges and student village.  High-bandwidth usage tasks can have a negative impact on wireless networks.  Any device that needs constant network connectivity and/or high-bandwidth should use a wired Ethernet network connection.  Any computers that host web pages, FTP services and/or multiplayer gaming need to use the wired CaneNet connection instead of WirelessCanes.

6. How secure is WirelessCanes?

WirelessCanes is a shared network and vulnerable to special tools that make it possible for others to review and capture data in transit. Like all shared networks, this network should be presumed insecure.  To reduce the risk of inappropriate disclosure of sensitive information, users are strongly urged to consider the following:

  • Use secure, encrypted sessions such as SSH in place of telnet, or HTTPS/SSL for online transactions
  • Use the residential wired CaneNet network

7. How fast is WirelessCanes?

The speed varies depending on location (see wireless cloud) and also the distance between the client and the wireless access point.  Actual throughput is also affected by the number of users on the wireless access point.

8. Will my PDA (Personal Digital Assistant) work on WirelessCanes?

Most PDAs with an 802.11 wireless LAN adapter will work if they also have a java-script capable browser that will allow you to type in your username (CaneID) and password in order to log on to WirelessCanes.

9. Is there are recommended wireless network card?

We support 802.11b, 802.11b/g, 802.11b/g/n, or 802.11a/b/g/n wireless adapters.  Compatible adapters may be purchased through the Technology Product Center.

10. How do visitors to UM access the WirelessCanes network?

Wireless guest access is part of WirelessCanes and it allows any guest to use the WirelessCanes wireless network wherever WirelessCanes access is available.

11. I can not connect to WirelessCanes. What is wrong?

Make sure your wireless network adapter has been properly registered and you are within the wireless cloud.  If the problem persists, please call the Telecommunications Help Desk at (305) 284-6565 option 1 or visit the CaneNetConnection office next to the Richter Library.

12. My connection to WirelessCanes starts out fine, then starts to give me trouble. What is wrong?

Signals from some Bluetooth wireless devices, cordless phones, other wireless networks and some microwave ovens can cause intermittent wireless network service outages.  Straying too far from a wireless access point (antenna) may also cause a drop in performance.  If you experience these types of connectivity problems, move around within a few feet from your original position to see if the problem self-rectifies.  If you think you have encountered an actual dead spot that is supposed to be within the wireless cloud according to the wireless coverage map, please contact the Telecommunications Help Desk at (305) 284-6565 option 1.