Q:Why did the University decide to review the existing Compensation structure?
A:The University needed a new compensation structure that would be equally competitive in all of its markets. The classification, titling, and grading system needs to reflect the market, represent what we do, and be understandable. The compensation system needs to provide for career development and growth, while being easy to administer. Also, in today's competition for talent, the University needed to ensure that it is able to retain and recruit top talent.

Q:Is the new structure going to be University wide?
A:Yes. The structure is designed for all University staff positions (not faculty), and is flexible enough so compensation can support the University's need to compete in different markets for talent. We began the first phase of the implementation in June 2008 and completed the final phase on December 2008.

Q:How was the new Compensation structure created?
A:An advisory council was created that included key stakeholders throughout the University participated in the structure's design. Staff from both Human Resources offices also partnered in the structure's design. Staff from both Human Resources offices also partnered with Segal Sibson Consulting firm, a leader in HR and benefits consulting for higher education institutions. Throughout the design of the new compensation structure, both Human Resources offices engaged leaders in departments too.

Q:How were jobs evaluated?
A:With the help of Segal Sibson, each Human Resources office used a variety of market salary surveys. Matches were selected based on similarity to the actual University job. Salary surveys used were from higher education, healthcare, research, and general industry sources. Depending upon where the University finds talent, survey data in some cases was national, regional, or local. For jobs without comparable market data, an internal benchmarking tool was consistently used. Job matches identified from these processes were confirmed with departmental leaders

Q:What is the difference between the new structure and the old structure?
A:Old StructureNew Structure
3 salary structures1 salary structure for all staff positions
Titles not consistently reflective of job dutiesMarket driven titles reflective of the job
No clear career progressionMore established career progression
Rigid and cumbersome to administerFlexible and easy to administer
Not clearTransparent

Q:How will pay be managed in this new compensation structure?
A:Salaries should fall within established salary band minimums and salary band maximums. However, due to sponsored funding limitations some positions may fall below established salary minimums for the life of the grant. Also, during the transition to the new compensation structure, salaries of employees with documented performance deficiencies may fall below new salary minimums. Once someone reaches their salary band maximum, merit increases based on performance and contributions will still be recognized through a lump sum payment. Bands are broad enough to accommodate market shifts in any given year and will be evaluated every two years.

Q:How will this structure be maintained?
A:The structure will be evaluated every two years and salary bands adjusted to reflect changes in the market.

Q:What should I do if I don't believe my job title or exempt/non-exempt status is right?
A:An appeals process will be established to review changes that employees don't believe are right? If an employee believes his/her job title or exempt/non-exempt status is not correct, they should discuss it with their supervisor. If the supervisor supports the employee, a revised job description is to be completed and discussed with the department's senior administrator. If the senior administrator supports the employee and supervisor, they must submit a request to the appropriate human resources office highlighting why a job evaluation must be conducted and include the revised job description. The appropriate human resources office will evaluate the request and discuss it with others as needed and inform the senior administrator and supervisor of the decision

Q:What should I do if I don't believe my job title or exempt/non-exempt status is right?
A:An appeals process will be established to review changes that employees don't believe are right? If an employee believes his/her job title or exempt/non-exempt status is not correct, they should discuss it with their supervisor. If the supervisor supports the employee, a revised job description is to be completed and discussed with the department's senior administrator. If the senior administrator supports the employee and supervisor, they must submit a request to the appropriate human resources office highlighting why a job evaluation must be conducted and include the revised job description. The appropriate human resources office will evaluate the request and discuss it with others as needed and inform the senior administrator and supervisor of the decision

Q:What should I do if I don't believe my job title or exempt/non-exempt status is right?
A:An appeals process will be established to review changes that employees don't believe are right? If an employee believes his/her job title or exempt/non-exempt status is not correct, they should discuss it with their supervisor. If the supervisor supports the employee, a revised job description is to be completed and discussed with the department's senior administrator. If the senior administrator supports the employee and supervisor, they must submit a request to the appropriate human resources office highlighting why a job evaluation must be conducted and include the revised job description. The appropriate human resources office will evaluate the request and discuss it with others as needed and inform the senior administrator and supervisor of the decision

Q:What should I do if I don't believe my job title or exempt/non-exempt status is right?
A:An appeals process will be established to review changes that employees don't believe are right? If an employee believes his/her job title or exempt/non-exempt status is not correct, they should discuss it with their supervisor. If the supervisor supports the employee, a revised job description is to be completed and discussed with the department's senior administrator. If the senior administrator supports the employee and supervisor, they must submit a request to the appropriate human resources office highlighting why a job evaluation must be conducted and include the revised job description. The appropriate human resources office will evaluate the request and discuss it with others as needed and inform the senior administrator and supervisor of the decision

Q:Where do I go if I have questions about the compensation structure?
A:Visit our Compensation Project Website, or contact your campus' Compensation personnel.