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University of Miami Civic Engagement People

  1. Edmund Abaka

    Edmund Abaka is an Associate Professor in the History Department and the Director of the Africana Studies Program. A graduate of the University of Cape Coast in Ghana, West Africa, Dr. Abaka earned his M.A. degree (European History) at the University of Guelph in Canada and a Ph.D in African History at York. While he teaches the general African history survey classes (History of Africa to 1800 and Africa Since 1800), he offers specialized courses on Southern Africa (up to Nelson Mandela), Egypt and the Nile Valley (Egypt, Sudan and Ethiopia), West Africa Since 1800, and Pan-Africanism.

  2. Muayad Abbas

    Muayad Abbas serves as a Lecturer in the School of Architecture at the University of Miami. Mr. Abbas is the founder and managing partner of Urbanis Advisors, a real estate development firm that is currently engaged in several projects in the US and the MENA region. His development strengths are complemented by his previous experiences in architecture and town planning gained by working at world-renowned Duany Plater-Zyberk (DPZ) Architects and Town Planners.

  3. Etiony Aldarondo

    Dr. Etiony Aldarondo is Associate Dean for Research and Director of the Dunspaugh-Dalton Community and Educational Well-Being Research Center in the School of Education at the University of Miami. He is an Associate Professor of Counseling Psychology in the Department of Educational and Psychological Studies. He also serves on the boards of directors for the National Latino Alliance for the Elimination of Domestic Violence, The Council on Contemporary Families, Project Hope, and Profunda.

  4. Michael Alessandri

    In addition to his role as Executive Director of UM-NSU CARD, Dr. Alessandri is also Director of the Division of Community Outreach and Engagement and Clinical Professor of Psychology and Pediatrics at the University of Miami. Dr. Alessandri has worked with individuals with autism and their families for nearly 30 years. He is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of Rochester, where he earned his Bachelor's degree in Psychology. He attended graduate school at Rutgers University, where he obtained both his M.S. (1989) and Ph.D. (1992) in Clinical Psychology. Dr. Alessandri completed his clinical internship at UNC-Chapel Hill's Center for Development and Learning (CDL). Prior to arriving in South Florida in 1996, Dr. Alessandri was an Assistant Professor of Psychology at San Jose State University (SJSU) and Associate Director of the Stanford University Pervasive Developmental Disorders Clinic.

  5. Anthony Alfieri

    Anthony V. Alfieri, Professor of Law and Dean's Distinguished Scholar, is the Founder and Director of the Center for Ethics and Public Service, and the Founder of the Historic Black Church Program, at the University of Miami School of Law.

  6. Anthony Alfieri

    Anthony V. Alfieri, Professor of Law and Dean's Distinguished Scholar, is the Founder and Director of the Center for Ethics and Public Service, and the Founder of the Historic Black Church Program, at the University of Miami School of Law.

  7. Joseph Alkana

    Joseph Alkana is an Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Miami. Some of Dr. Alkana's research interests include: 19th-century American literature and Jewish literature.

  8. Sheryl Alonso

  9. Todd Ambrosia

    Dr. Ambrosia is board certified in Family Practice and is a Distinguished Fellow of the National Academies of Practice, Academy of Nursing. His recent academic projects involve developing and implementing a Nursing Informatics program; and developing curricula related to international health initiatives. He is active clinically in Adolescent and Young Adult Primary Care, and has a research interest in increasing health promotion and reducing risk in young men.

  10. Bridget Christine Arce

    Christine Arce is an Assistant Professor of Spanish in the College of Arts and Sciences Modern Languages and Literature Department. Her research interests include 19th and 20th century Latin American literature and cultural studies, gender and women's studies, race and indigeneity and Mexican and Brazilian Folklore.

  11. Traci Ardren

    Traci Ardren serves as Professor and Chair of the Department of Anthropology. She is an anthropological archaeologist interested in New World prehistoric cultures and the myriad ways the ancient past is interpreted. Her research focuses on gender, iconography, architecture and other forms of symbolic representation in the archaeological record.

  12. Robin Bachin

    Robin F. Bachin is the Charlton W. Tebeau Associate Professor of History and Assistant Provost for Civic and Community Engagement at the University of Miami.

  13. Ricardo Bascuas

    Professor Ricardo J. Bascuas teaches in the areas of evidence, criminal procedure, and international criminal law. He created and directs the School of Law's Federal Appellate Clinic, which, in partnership with the Federal Public Defender's Office for the Southern District of Florida, represents indigent defendants before the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit.

  14. Lisa Beal

    Lisa Beal's research interests are in large scale ocean circulation and its role in climate. Her community work revolves around the retention of women in oceanography and the advancement of resources to improve our understanding of the climatic importance of the Greater Agulhas System, both regionally and globally.

  15. Richard Beckman

    Rich Beckman is the Knight Chair in Visual Journalism at the School of Communication at the University of Miami and a Distinguished Visiting Professor at the Universidad de los Andes in Santiago, Chile. His current area of teaching and writing is in the genre of multimedia design and production, although he began his career as a photojournalist and taught in that area for 20 years.

  16. Caroline Bettinger-Lopez

    Caroline Bettinger-López is an Associate Professor of Clinical Legal Education and Director of the Human Rights Clinic at the University of Miami School of Law. Her scholarship, advocacy, and teaching concern international human rights law and advocacy, violence against women, gender and race discrimination, immigrants' rights, and clinical legal education.

  17. Charles Bohl

    Charles Bohl is an Associate Professor and the Director of the graduate program in Real Estate Development and Urbanism (MRED+U) at UM's School of Architecture, where he directed the interdisciplinary Knight Program in Community Building from 2000-2008.

  18. Marten Brienen

  19. Richard Brumback

    Richard Brumback is a Lecturer in the Department of Political Science at the University of Miami. He holds a Ph.D. in Public Administration from Florida State University.

  20. Kent Burnett

  21. Greg Bush

    Professor Bush is an Associate Professor of History. He specializes in modern American history, with an emphasis on political, intellectual, and cultural history. His scholarly interests revolve around media history, perceptions of crowd behavior, and public history that promotes better understanding of South Florida’s past.

  22. Maria Carlo

    María Carlo joined the University of Miami faculty in 2002 after serving as assistant professor in education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She earned a Ph.D. in psychology at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Carlo’s research has focused on the development of literacy skills in bilingual children and adults.

  23. Anita Cava

    Anita Cava is Professor of Business Law in the UM School of Business. Professor Cava’s research interests are the legal and ethical aspects of health administration as well as corporate/community engagement and business ethics.

  24. Rocco Ceo

    Rocco Ceo is a Professor of Architecture. He is also the Director of Undergraduate Studies and Director of the UM DesignBuild Program. His teaching areas include: Design, Design Research in the Studio Setting, Mechanical & Freehand Drawing, and Design/Build.

  25. Sonia Chao

    Sonia Chao serves as Research Associate Professor in the School of Architecture and Director of the Center for Urban and Community Design. Her teaching areas include: sustainable/environmental design, historic preservation, and urban design.

  26. Sanjeev Chatterjee

    Sanjeev Chatterjee is an award-winning documentary filmmaker and professor in the department of Cinema and Interactive Media with a secondary appointment in the department of Journalism at the School of Communication, University of Miami. He also serves on the faculties of the Salzburg Academy on Media and Global Change and the Young India Fellowship.

  27. Rosina Cianelli

  28. Nancy Clasby

  29. Jaime Correa

    Jaime Correa is an Associate Professor in Practice at the UM School of Architecture. He is also one of the founders of Jaime Correa and Associates, the Miami-based design firm, as well as a former founding partner of several other New Urbanism firms in the State of Florida. As part of his firm, he explores issues of globalization and New Urbanism(s).

  30. Margaret Crosbie-Burnett

  31. Adib Cure

    Adib Cure serves as an Assistant Professor in Practice in the School of Architecture. He also co-founded his own practice called CURE & PENABAD Architecture and Urban Design with partner Carie Penabad.

  32. Don D. Coffman

  33. Carolyn Dachinger

  34. Marvin Dawkins

  35. Shannon de l'Etoile

    Shannon de l’Etoile, Ph.D., is associate dean, Graduate Studies, and professor for the Music Therapy program at the University of Miami Frost School of Music. Dr. de l’Etoile is a board-certified music therapist and current member of both the American Music Therapy Association (AMTA), and the Southeastern Region of the AMTA. She is recognized as a Fellow of the Robert F. Unkefer Academy of Neurologic Music Therapy, has served on the editorial review board for the Journal of Music Therapy and is currently on the editorial review board for Music Therapy Perspectives. Her clinical background includes working with adults with mental illness, children and adolescents with emotional and behavioral disorders, adults and children with developmental disabilities, and adults and children with neurologic disorders.

  36. Juan Carlos Del Valle

    Juan Carlos 'JC' del Valle is the Assistant Vice-President of the Office of Government and Community Relations at UM. He is responsible for local matters, and matters related to medical, real estate, facilities and planning.

  37. Ivonne DeLaPaz-Calzadilla

  38. Christine Delgado

    Christine Delgado is a Research Assistant Professor in the College of Arts and Sciences Department of Psychology. Her research interests include children with developmental disabilities and reproductive health awareness and education.

  39. John Dellagloria

    John Dellagloria is an Adjunct Professor in the School of Business Administration. His research interests include real property law and zoning and government land use regulation.

  40. James Donnelly

    James Donnelly is a Lecturer in the American Studies Department at the University of Miami.

  41. Lisa Dorfman

  42. Dina Elias Rodas

  43. Charles Elsesser

  44. Scotney Evans

    Scotney Evans is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Education and Psychological Studies and the Faculty Master at Eaton Residential College. He teaches in the undergraduate major in Human and Social Development (HSD) as well as the new master’s program in Community and Social Change.

  45. Marc Fajer

    Professor Fajer has taught property, elements, antitrust law, American legal history, constitutional law, housing discrimination, and identity politics and law. The Faculty Senate recognized Professor Fajer's contributions to the Law School and University communities by presenting him with the University’s Outstanding Teaching Award in 2004.

  46. Eric Firley

    Eric Firley is an Assistant Professor in the School of Architecture. His teaching areas include: urban design and architecture studios, housing, infrastructure, and theory of urban design.

  47. Rafael Fornes

  48. Joy Galliford

    Joy A. Galliford is a lecturer and researcher in the Music Education Program at the University of Miami Frost School of Music. Dr. Galliford is an active member of the Music Educators National Conference, Florida Music Educators Association and Florida Elementary Music Educators Association, Early Childhood Music and Movement Association, National Federation of Music Clubs, Phi Kappa Lambda, Sigma Alpha Iota, and National Guild of Piano Teachers.

  49. Pamela Geller

    Pamela Geller is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at UM. Dr. Geller is strongly committed to the notion of archaeology as a sub-discipline that should draw insights from throughout the social sciences, humanities, and natural sciences.

  50. Pamela Geller

  51. Jeremy Glazer

  52. George Gonzalez

    George A. Gonzalez (Ph.D., University of Southern California, 1997) is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Miami. He has been at the University of Miami since 1999. Dr. Gonzalez's area of research specialization is U.S. environmental politics and policy (e.g., energy, pollution, global warming).

  53. Michelle Gonzalez Maldonado

    Dr. Michelle A. Gonzalez Maldonado is an Associate Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Miami. Her research and teaching interests include Latino/a, Latin American, and Feminist Theologies, as well as inter-disciplinary work in Afro-Caribbean Studies.

  54. Kenneth Goodman

    Kenneth W. Goodman, Ph.D., is Professor of Medicine and jointly of Philosophy, Public Health Sciences, Health Informatics, Electrical and Computer Engineering and Nursing and Health Studies. He directs the University of Miami Bioethics Program, a WHO Collaborating Center for Ethics and Global Health Policy and the Florida Bioethics Network.

  55. Jeanne Gottlieb

  56. Richard Grant

    Richard Grant is a Professor in the Department of Geography and Regional Studies. He is a human geographer with specializations in economic and urban geography. His research interests include globalization, globalizing cities, the work and economy of slums, and international and regional trade patterns.

  57. Henry Green

    Henry Green is a Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Miami. He received his Ph.D. from St. Andrews University (Britain) after postgraduate work in Canada, at the Sorbonne (France) and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel). Currently, Professor Green is the International Director of Sephardi Voices: Audio-Visual Histories of Jews from North Africa and the Middle East. He teaches courses on Modern Israel, Jewish Civilization, American Jewry, Human Rights and Refugees from the Middle East, and Spirituality and Education, a course that pioneers the concept of holistic education and includes meditation and community service.

  58. William Green

    William Scott Green joined the University of Miami as Senior Vice Provost and Dean of Undergraduate Education in July 2006. He also holds an appointment as Professor of Religious Studies and Senior Fellow in the Sue and Leonard Miller Center for Contemporary Judaic Studies.

  59. Kim Grinfeder

    Kim Grinfeder joined the faculty of the School of Communication in 2003 and holds a Master's degree in Interactive Telecommunications from New York University and a Bachelor of Arts in History from the University of Miami. His research interests include interaction design and multimedia storytelling. His professional background includes positions in design, programming, and new media consulting. Grinfeder currently teaches in the areas multimedia design, programming and production. His latest project, “Grand Avenue News,” aims to create a shared communication platform for the West Coconut Grove community.

  60. Marie Guerda Nicolas

    Marie Guerda Nicolas joined the EPS faculty in August, 2008. As a multicultural (Haitian American) and multilingual psychologist (Spanish, French, and Haitian Creole), her research is reflective of her background and interests. Her current research centers on partnering with ethnically diverse and immigrant communities to develop culturally effective mental health interventions to combat depression, address issues of racism and racial discrimination stress, enhance the racial and ethnic identity development of children and adolescents, and promote individual, family, and community well-being.

  61. Stephen Guerra, Jr

    Stephen Guerra, Jr., is a jazz composition lecturer in the department of Studio Music and Jazz at the University of Miami Frost School of Music. He is also the conductor of the Frost Studio Jazz Band, winning DownBeat student awards in both 2010 and 2011

  62. Ali Habashi

    Ali Habashi is an award winning documentary filmmaker who has covered stories in more than 30 countries. His work has been featured in CBS4, NBC6, Miami Herald and USA Today and aired on international Cable and Public TV channels such as Discovery (US and India), Canal+(France), CZTV (Czech Republic), LAPTV (Latin America) and CNN Türk. With an interest to better understand pressing global challenges, his work in recent years has focused on communicating science on a range of topics such as ethnic disparities in health care, access to clean drinking water and sanitation, ocean health index, aging populations and potential implications of increasing the human health-span on economies, resources and generational succession. Ali is currently teaching courses in digital production at the Department of Cinema and Interactive Media as well as courses in science documentary film production for graduate students majoring in Public Health, Molecular Biology and Environmental Sciences. In addition to his teaching responsibilities, from 1998 to 2014, he served as the Director of the Edward H. Arnold Center for Confluent Media Studies at the University of Miami where he initiated and produced several international collaborative media initiatives.

  63. Rosemary Hall

    Dr. Hall teaches and conducts research at the School of Nursing and Health Studies. She has created and implemented health care delivery models that serve the very poor, the homeless, immigrants, African Americans and the elderly within the State of Florida.

  64. Neil Hammerschlag

    Neil Hammerschlag's research centers broadly on the behavioral ecology and conservation biology of marine predators. His current and future research has four core themes: (1) understanding how predator-prey interactions impact individual traits, community structure and ecosystem processes through trophic cascades; (2) evaluating the ecological and evolutionary implications of variation in physiological and morphological adaptations on the movement ecology of marine predators; (3) examining how coastal urbanization affects the behavior, ecology and fitness of highly mobile fishes; and (4) testing theories of individual specialization in fish diet and migration across multiple trophic levels. My research philosophy relies on two fundamental approaches.

  65. Denis Hector

    Associate Professor and Associate Dean at the School of Architecture with a secondary appointment in the Department of Civil, Architectural & Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, and an advisory board member of the Abess Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy, Denis Hector is a registered architect with expertise in structure and environment.

  66. Jorge Hernandez

    In 1987 Jorge L. Hernandez joined the faculty of the University of Miami and established his firm. His teach areas include Architecture Design and Theory, Architectural History and Urban Design.

  67. Teresa Hood

    Teresa Hood is a Lecturer in the Department of Geological Sciences at UM.

  68. Mary Hooshmand

    Dr. Mary Hooshmand is an Assistant Clinical Professor at the University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies with a secondary appointment as Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the Miller School of Medicine. She previously served as the Regional Nursing Director for Children’s Medical Services (CMS) Southeast Florida Region, which is the lead Title V agency in the state of Florida for children with special health care needs. This region encompasses six counties in the south Florida region which extends from the Ft. Lauderdale area in the south to Vero Beach in the north and from the coastal region of the east to Lake Okeechobee in the west. Her background includes over 30 years nursing experience including state government positions in New York and Florida.

  69. Danielle Houck

    Danielle Houck is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of English at the University of Miami. She majored in Creative Writing at Miami University and studied Fiction Writing at Georgetown University. Houck earned her M.F.A. (fiction) from the University of Miami in 2000. Her areas of interest include: Art, Composition, Creative Writing, Organizational Communication, Popular Culture, Technology, Visual Rhetoric

  70. Elyse Hurtado

  71. Jan Jacobowitz

    Jan L. Jacobowitz is a Lecturer in Law and the Director of the Professional Responsibility and Ethics (PREP) Program Program at the University of Miami School of Law. She has presented more than one hundred PREP Ethics CLE Seminars and has written and been a featured speaker or panelist on topics such as Legal Ethics in Social Media and Advertising, Lawyer’s First Amendment Rights, Cultural Awareness in the Practice of Law, and Mindful Ethics. Jacobowitz also teaches the courses, Social Media and the Law and Mindful Ethics: Professional Responsibility for Lawyers in the Digital Age, which served as the catalyst for the book that she co-authored, Mindfulness & Professional Responsibility—Incorporating Mindfulness into the Law School Curriculum.

  72. Edward Julbe

    Edward Julbe joined the School of Communication in the spring of 2008. He teaches courses in television production and broadcasting and serves as the faculty advisor to the award-winning, student-produced weekly sports show, SportsDesk.

  73. Juan Kanai

    Juan Miguel Kanai is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography and Regional Studies at UM. His research explores how intertwined processes of urbanization and globalization shape contemporary social life. With a focus on the territorial policies and politics of redevelopment in globalized cities, his work engages with postcolonial urban theory; the spatiality of inequality; regional, city and neighborhood planning; and the place of the middle classes in the contemporary city.

  74. Elaine Kauschinger

  75. Sean Kilpatrick

    Sean Kilpatrick is the Director of Undergraduate Academic Services in the Department of Psychology. He earned an M.S.Ed. in Higher Education Administration with a concentration in Enrollment Management and a Certificate in Student Life and Development. Sean oversees all UASP functions, supervises the Peer Advising Liaisons (PALs), and ensures the Department provides the highest-quality advising services. He also teaches the new freshmen and new transfer student orientation, advising, and mentoring courses, FACT (UMX 100) and TUMS (PSY 365). Sean is available to meet with all students regarding advising, curriculum planning, research participation, and graduate school and career preparation. His background in enrollment management, student affairs, and research make him an excellent resource for students.

  76. Casey Klofstad

    Casey Klofstad is the Director of Undergraduate Studies and an Associate Professor of Political Science in the Department of Political Science. He studies how society and biology influence human decision-making.

  77. Erin Kobetz

    Dr. Erin Kobetz is an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at UM. She is also the Director of the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center's (SCCC) Disparities and Community Outreach Core Resource, and the Scholar in Residence at the Jay Weiss Center for Social Medicine and Health Equity. Dr. Kobetz has substantial experience with disparities-focused research, and has been involved in multiple community-based participatory research endeavors to understand racial/ethnic differences in breast and cervical cancer outcomes.

  78. Laura Kohn-Wood

    Laura Kohn-Wood serves as Chair and Associate Professor of the Educational and Psychological Studies Department. She is also Faculty Master in Pearson Residential College. Her teaching and research interests are related to race, ethnicity and culture, mental health, the promotion of community strengths, and social justice.

  79. Dana Krempels

    Dana Krempels is a Senior Lecturer and the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Biology. She also serves as a coordinator of first year biology laboratories.

  80. Robert Latham

    Robert Latham is a Clinical Instructor & Practitioner-in-Residence at the University of Miami Children and Youth Law Clinic. In the clinic, he teaches students who handle cases involving abused, abandoned and neglected children in a variety of forums, including dependency and family courts, administrative hearings, and federal and appellate courts.

  81. Marni Lennon

    Marni Lennon, Assistant Dean for Public Interest and Pro Bono and Lecturer In Law, holds a B.A. from the University of Southern California and a J.D. and M.S.Ed from the University of Miami. She is the founder and director of the HOPE Public Interest Resource Center, which features over 25 outreach and advocacy projects, and has worked and taught at the University of Miami School of Law for 17 years, serving for nine years as Assistant Dean of Students and Director of Disability Services.

  82. Teresa Lesiuk

    Teresa Lesiuk, Ph.D., is associate professor and program director for the Music Therapy program at the University of Miami Frost School of Music. Dr. Lesiuk’s research interests include investigating the role of music and music therapy in high stress occupations (e.g., air traffic control and computer information systems development). Dr. Lesiuk has ten years experience of university teaching and program administration, collectively, from the University of the Incarnate Word and the University of Western Ontario.

  83. Marianna Makri

    Marianna Makri is an Associate Professor in the School of Business Administration's Department of Management. Her research interests include corporate governance, innovation and technology management, and entrepreneurship and family firm dynamics.

  84. Christopher Mann

  85. Lillian Manzor

    Lillian Manzor is an Associate Professor in the College of Arts and Sciences Modern Languages and Literature. Her research interests include Latin American and Latino/a cultures, performance studies, gender studies, and literature and the visual arts.

  86. Gina Maranto

    Gina Maranto directs the undergraduate program in Ecosystem Science and Policy and coordinates the graduate program in Environmental Science and Policy. She is a Senior Lecturer in English Composition. She received her M.A. from The Writing Seminars at The Johns Hopkins University in 1980, and her B.A. in English Literature from Pomona College in 1977.

  87. Louis Marcelin

    Louis H. Marcelin is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at UM. He is the Director of Research at the Family and Youth Community Research Center, Inc. of which he is a co-founder. He is also the Principal Investigator for the Haitian Adolescent Study at the Department of Anthropology.

  88. Mary McKay

  89. Anita Meinbach

    A former Miami-Dade Teacher of the Year, Anita Meinbach joined the University of Miami faculty in 2003. She earned her Ed.D. in elementary education from the University of Miami as well. Formerly with the Miami-Dade Public School System, Meinbach was a teacher, curriculum writer and teacher trainer, proving seminars and guidance in curriculum development. At Southwood Middle School, Meinbach directed student reading programs and wrote “Strategies for Success,” a guide to integrating literature into other areas of the curriculum. She also established special tutorial programs for at-risk students, and coordinated the school’s gifted program. In addition to teaching courses in “Children’ Literature,” “Language Arts,” and “Classroom Management,” responsibilities to the University of Miami School of Education and Human Development include her work as Director of the Jack and Harriet Rosenfeld Foundation Program in Jewish Education.

  90. Sarah Meltzoff

    Sarah Meltzoff is an Associate Professor in the Department of Marine Ecosystems and Society at UM. Her research interests include: Marine resource management and sustainable development policy and social analyses of fisheries and aquaculture.

  91. Emma Mitchell

    Emma McKim Mitchell has recently completed her PhD in nursing at the University of Virginia, in Charlottesville, Virginia. Her research focus has been in sustainability practices in nursing and nursing interventions abroad.

  92. Armando Montero

    Armando Montero serves as a Lecturer in the School of Architecture at the University of Miami.

  93. Robert Moore

    Robert Moore joined the University of Miami faculty in 1975, and focuses on teaching children with learning and behavioral problems. He is currently coordinator, Undergraduate Special Education Program, a resident master at Mahoney Residential College and professor in residence at Bel-Aire Elementary School.

  94. Sarah Mourer

    Sarah Mourer founded and directs the University of Miami Innocence Clinic and the Miami Law Death Penalty Clinic. She taught in the University of Miami Clinical Placement Program, and the University of Miami Externship Program. She also taught Substantive Criminal Law and directed the Litigation Skills Program. She is an instructor and lecturer for the National Institute of Trial Advocacy, and has coached the University of Miami’s School of Law Mock Trial Team. Professor Mourer is a frequent speaker on topics ranging from the death penalty and trial advocacy, to the Fourth Amendment and wrongful convictions. Professor Mourer has published articles ranging from suggestive eyewitness identification, federal habeas corpus to death penalty clinical teaching.

  95. John Murphy

    John Murphy is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Miami. His research interests include: sociological theory, globalization, and community-based investigations.

  96. JoNel Newman

    JoNel Newman is an associate professor of clinical legal education. Professor Newman serves as a Commissioner on the American Bar Association's Commission on Immigration. She teaches professional responsibility and directs the Health and Elder Law Clinic.

  97. Lamar Noriega

  98. Stephen Nostrand

    Stephen Nostrand is a Lecturer in the School of Architecture at the University of Miami. He is also the CEO of Colliers International South Florida.Mr.Nostrand has been directly involved in commercial real estate for 35 years, but has been exposed to it all of his life as the third generation in his family to specialize in this industry

  99. Donald Olson

    Donald Olson is a Professor in the Department of Ocean Sciences at UM. Dr. Olson's interests include ocean circulation dynamics, mesoscale phenomena, theory and observation of ocean frontal zones; drifter and satellite remote sensing studies of the surface circulation, tracer dynamics; processing studies of biophysical interactions and ecosystem modelling.

  100. Johis Ortega

    Dr.Ortega is an undergraduate lecturer, director of undergraduate clinical placement and director of international programs at the University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies. He teaches Adult Health III, Role Transition, Pathophysiology, Leadership and Management, International Health “Transcultural Nursing”, Across Life Span, Leadership and Management, and Adult Medical Surgical.

University of Miami Civic Engagement People

University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

  1. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Coconut Grove Collaborative

    The project promotes the social, economic and physical renaissance of the West Grove neighborhood.

  2. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Biscayne Park Neighborhood Visioning Report & Charrette

    City of Biscayne Park Community Design Workshop

  3. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Buena Vista East/Heights Historic Disctrict Charrette & Study

    Improving the infrastructure, character, and livability of the Buena Vista Historic District and neighborhood, while preserving its historic and cultural assets.

  4. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    The Building Project

    The Center for Urban and Community Design (CUCD) gives architecture students a chance to apply classroom learning to real-life situations.

  5. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Coconut Grove Playhouse Charrette

    In March 2008, more than 150 preservationists, students and residents participated in a three-day charrette with the aim of repositioning the Coconut Grove Playhouse as a major regional theater.

  6. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Grand Avenue Vision Plan

    The Center for Urban and Community Design (CUCD)  incorporated many recommendations for zoning changes, streetscape improvements, and measures that would increase security and livability from the City of Miami’s Coconut Grove Planning Study of 1996.

  7. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Haiti Charrette

    The Haitian government’s Commission for Reconstruction asked the University of Miami School of Architecture to host a 5-day event to address post-earthquake planning between March 24 and 28, 2010.

  8. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Miami Springs Façade Renovation Program

    The goal of this program is to provide architectural direction for improving existing buildings and for future buildings and to stimulate simple creative design solutions while promoting a sense of relatedness among properties.

  9. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Overtown Mixed-Use Development

    A group of graduate students from the Suburb and Town Design Program developed preliminary designs to demonstrate how neighborhoods can be revitalized to become more self-sustaining through combinations of residential, commercial and parking uses.

  10. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Historic Preservation: A Green Alternative Conference

    A conference focused on preserving older buildings and neighborhoods as a powerful force for environmental sustainability

  11. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    International Outreach: Santa Rosa de Jaregui Mexico Charrette

    UM/SOA Faculty and CUCD director, Sonia Chao and research affiliate, Gustavo Sanchez-Hugalde were invited by the Instituto Tecnologico de Monterey in Queretaro, Mexico to lead in a week-long charrette.

  12. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Manoguayabo Charrette

    Develop a master plan and study different types of housing such as civic buildings for the impoverished community of Manoguayabo, Dominican Republic

  13. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Spanish Editions of Urban Design Publications

    “Spanish Editions of Urban Design Publications” was a publication initiative (2002-2010) of the University of Miami School of Architecture faculty and the Center for Urban and Community Design (CUCD) members.

  14. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Sponsored Studio: Turning Point Baptist Church

    Turning Point Baptist Church approached the School of Architecture’s Center for Urban & Community Design to request design proposals for a Church, Community Center & Nature Retreat for a parcel of land located on the fringes of Redland in South Dade

  15. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    St. Matthew’s Church Fellowship Hall Addition

    Becoming involved in the community and offering the School of Architecture’s expertise has led to requests from individuals and organizations to advise on design possibilities.

  16. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Transit-Oriented Development at Douglas Station

    A prime gateway property on the main north-south artery entering West Coconut Grove is currently occupied by county welfare offices.  The county has offered the property for development gratis.

  17. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Tropical Vernacular Architecture Symposium

    This symposium explored the importance of learning from the past to build a sustainable future in tropical climates. Lectures provided insight on vernacular building types and techniques.

  18. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    West Coconut Revitalization Pilot Project

    In 2002, a group of architecture students were assigned to produce three new designs for affordable homes and to collaborate with the construction of the homes.

  19. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Under the Sun: Sustainable Innovations & Traditions

    A symposium hosted to promote, educate and discuss innovative green building techniques and practices, relating the topic to the traditions of vernacular architecture and sustainable urbanism.

  20. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Agulhas Current Time Series Experiment

    Measured the variability of the Agulhas Current using a combination of current meter moorings and satellite data

  21. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Digital Atlas of Marine Species and Locations Project

    An interactive database which catalogs marine life in photographs by geographic location while providing encyclopedic content.

  22. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Exploring Marine Science Day

    RSMAS has partnered with the American Association of University Women and Miami-Dade county public schools annually to host a day of interactive learning for 6th and 7th grade girls.

  23. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Marine Conservation Science & Policy Service Learning Program

    The Marine Conservation Science & Policy Service Learning Program provides practical, hands-on marine science education and self-initiated research project opportunities for high school, undergraduate and graduate students.

  24. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Ocean Kids

    Reaches out to the at-risk children of Miami, as well as utilize the marine science and conservation arena to inspire curiosity, excitement about learning, and confidence.

  25. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    R. J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Program

    Fosters STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) literacy and advance marine conservation by conducting cutting edge scientific research and involving graduate, undergraduate, high school students and the public.

  26. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Sea Secrets Lecture Series

    An annual lecture series about our oceans designed for the South Florida non-scientific community, featuring distinguished scientists and explorers.

  27. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Upward Bound IMPACT Program

    The program prepares low income, first-generation students for 2- or 4-year higher education opportunities.

  28. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Southridge High School Partnership Initiative

    The Southridge Partnership is a program that connects students with Southridge High School teachers in history and language arts to enhance the curriculum, give guest lectures, and mentor students.

  29. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Empowering Capable Climate Communicators

    Harold R. Wanless and colleagues are informing public debate about climate change as panels of experts share their scientific knowledge and judgments with community members and to provide them with communication, presentation, and policy skills.

  30. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Center for the Humanities Teacher Workshops

    The University of Miami Center for the Humanities presents a series of three workshops in Fall 2011 for Miami Dade Public School teachers.

  31. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Exercise Physiology Organization

    Students employ the latest information on therapeutic exercise and nutrition strategies to help combat chronic disease, obesity, aging, and other aspects of physical vulnerability among the diverse group of individuals of all ages in South Florida.

  32. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Healthy Start Summer Program

    The HSSP brings approximately 100 adolescents from all over Miami-Dade County together for six weeks on the University of Miami campus to explore topics in health and wellness and participate in lots of exercise.

  33. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Zumbathon Fundraiser: UM Sports Nutrition Classes Raise Money for Somalia & Our Troops!

    A fundraising project that partners our students with global causes which impact the health of adults and children worldwide.

  34. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Bankruptcy Clinic

    The Bankruptcy Assistance Clinic at UM Law offers pro bono legal services to low-income individuals who are dealing with bankruptcy.

  35. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Capital Defense Workshop

    This project allows reliable law school interns to offer death penalty lawyers high quality legal assistance on capital cases while providing the students an academic experience of a lifetime.

  36. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Children and Youth Law Clinic

    Represents children in foster care and former foster youth in dependency, health care, mental health, disability, independent living, education, immigration and other general civil legal matters, ensuring that they have a voice in court proceedings.

  37. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Community Lawyering Clinic

    Students work with the Community Justice Project (CJP) of Florida Legal Services, Inc. to provide legal assistance to community organizations fighting for racial and economic justice in Miami’s low-income communities of color.

  38. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Federal Appellate Clinic

    The Federal Appellate Clinic is a one-semester, three-credit course that provides upper-level students with the opportunity to plan, research, and draft federal appeals for indigent criminal defendants.

  39. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Health Rights & Elder Law Clinic

    The Health and Elder Law Clinic is a two-semester, eight-credit course in which students assist low-income elderly and health-impaired clients under the supervision of a professor and clinical instructors.

  40. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Human Rights Clinic

    The Human Rights Clinic exposes students to the practice of law in the international and cross-cultural context of human rights litigation and advocacy.

  41. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Immigration Clinic

    The Immigration Clinic provides a challenging opportunity for students to advocate on behalf of immigrants in a wide variety of complex immigration proceedings.

  42. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Investor Rights Clinic

    The Investor Rights Clinic offers students the opportunity to represent investors with claims against their brokers in arbitration and mediation proceedings before the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA).

  43. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Miami Innocence Clinic

    The Miami Innocence Project is dedicated to identifying and rectifying wrongful convictions and is a workshop committed to exonerating innocent individuals and combating injustice

  44. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Tenants’ Rights Clinic

    Students represent a client from the beginning of a case until its completion and primarily involves clients being evicted from public and subsidized housing, receiving Section 8 terminations, and having their affordable housing applications denied.

  45. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    University of Miami School of Law Legal Corps

    The University of Miami School of Law Legal Corps is an ambitious, postgraduate fellowship program that provides public interest organizations, government agencies, and the judiciary with bar certified, legal talent.

  46. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Experience the Music (U-Move)

    Experience the Music is an easily understood approach to child wellness that is delivered by preschool teachers, providing opportunities for optimal brain development in the early stages of a child’s life.

  47. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Frost Music Time

    An early childhood music enrichment outreach program to serve the community.

  48. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Frost Mentoring Program

    This mentoring program usies music as a bridge to help at-risk students stay in school and on a positive course for the future.

  49. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Harmony Project Miami

    Frost School of Music Faculty and Teaching Fellows will mentor at-risk students who will participate in music class two to three times per week.

  50. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    HMI Outbound

    HMI Outbound is a community engagement program presented by the Henry Mancini Institute that brings a distinctive blend of stylistically diverse music to public schools and community venues in South Florida.

  51. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Mays Conservatory Partnership

    Through this partnership with the Arthur C. Polly Mays Conservatory for the Arts, the Frost School of Music provide instruction and also arts-based experiences to the students in the form of concerts, workshops, and master classes.

  52. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    New Horizons Band

    An adult music program (ages 50+) geared toward beginning instrumentalists in the greater Miami area.

  53. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Science Made Sensible

    The SMS program pairs graduate student fellows in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) disciplines with local middle school science teachers.

  54. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Interuniversity Institute for Research and Development (INURED)

    INURED’s mission is to contribute to the development of high-level research and scientific training in Haiti with the aim of improving the educational, socioeconomic and political conditions of Haiti’s people.

  55. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Production of The House of Bernarda Alba

    In partnership with the Adrienne Arsht Center, the theatre department will be co-producing and designing the play, “The House of Bernarda Alba” in October. UM student actors will participate in it.

  56. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Religion and Public Life: A Forum

    Examines the crucial role that religion plays in the public arena by focusing on key issues that are part of the contemporary conversation about public policy.

  57. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Friends of Philosophy

    The Friends of Philosophy Dialogues are one to two per semester, briefs talks followed by dialogue with audience members from the South Florida community.  Talks are informal presentations aimed at members of the non-academic community. 

  58. University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

    Booker T. Washington High School STEM Partnership

    The Booker T. Washington STEM Partnership is designed to promote a college-going culture and produce a mutually beneficial collaboration among high school teachers, UM undergraduates, and high school students.

University of Miami Civic Engagement Projects

University of Miami Civic Engagement Courses

  1. MGT100 - Management 100: School of Business Administration

    In order for freshmen to better understand the complexities of the modern global business environment and the importance of ethical business practices and civic engagement, Management 100 (also known as FIRST Step) was designed to anchor the first-semester business curriculum. In this course, students learn essential business critical thinking skills through real-world case studies, lectures, and multimedia presentations.

    A pivotal aspect of the course requires that freshmen cultivate their abilities to work in a team environment. Mentored by an upper-class business student,  the freshman cohort engages with a local not-for-profit organization that has presented a particular business challenge which needs to be addressed. The team must work cohesively throughout the semester to develop a potential solution or solutions to their clientele’s particular issue or challenge. A formal presentation of the freshman product to the client is the culminating event of the semester.

  2. ARC 407-609 - Architectural Design: Havana Preservation Studio

    This studio project will concentrate on the opportunities and challenges of designing a building within a historic fabric. Students will become aware of international canons and tools used to guide preservation initiatives and they will better understand how preservation catalyzes economic development, particularly in an impoverished country. The class will also learn about the Integral Management Model employed by the preservation Office of Havana (OHC) on interventions within the World Heritage Site.

  3. ARC 509/510 - Elective Studio: Overtown Redevelopment Studio

    This is a capstone project that offers master planning and services for communities all over the country. This year we will be working in the City of Hollywood, FL.

  4. ARC 584 - Off the Map: Learning from Informal Cities in Latin America

    While undeniably precarious in construction, unplanned cities exhibit underlying urban and architectural patterns of remarkable resilience, and that moreover reflect their inhabitants’ enduring cultural values. Built without the assistance of architects and/or planners, they are folkloric expressions of a given people worthy of study. Given this framework, the seminar will initially focus on the study and analysis of informal settlements throughout Latin America. The ultimate objective of the course is to develop a new understanding of these communities, in order to formulate effective modes of engagement with the informal. In addition, the relationship between the formal and the informal will be the basic platform of our investigations throughout the semester. Each participant in the course is expected to complete readings, participate in discussions, and complete a research proposal.

  5. ARC 621 - Seminar on Housing, Transportation and Infrastructure

    Part I: Survey of housing theories and projects with emphasis on morphological context, typology and composition - focus on topics of modernity. Part II: Introduction to thoroughfare design and walk-ability principles; description of urban, suburban, rural and regional infrastructure.

  6. ARC 623 - Public Participation Methods – Charrette with MRED+U Program

    The CDD Workshop assists communities with visioning, planning, design and development challenges through the combined resources of faculty and graduate students in real estate, urban design and architecture. We will define the scope of the work in conjunction with the needs of the community, but it can encompass any of the areas of expertise and training received at UM, including: evaluating sites and properties by looking for opportunities and constraints for development (physical as well as land use, real estate, policy, management and other topics), conducting market analyses by examining the potential for redevelopment or re-positioning of properties, performing financial studies and preparing pro formas, evaluating existing codes, plans and regulations, advising on preservation-oriented development, and providing planning, architecture and urban design services.

  7. RED 601 - Introduction to Real Estate Development and Urbanism

    Fundamentals of real estate development of urban places, including the many challenges of the development process such as analyzing market sectors and development opportunities, comprehending the development context of regulation, public policy and politics, raising investment capital, assembling land, program formulation, building types, construction management, marketing, and sales.

  8. RED 660 - Urban Infill, Preservation and Redevelopment

    Urban infill and redevelopment practice introduces complexities and opportunities that differ significantly from edge city and greenfield development practice. This course will build students competencies for infill and redevelopment practice focusing on: barriers and solutions for urban infill development; urban site analysis; mixed-use development; repositioning of urban land, vacant and underutilized properties (including greyfield and brownfield opportunities); long-term land leases; tax incentives, historic preservation, public-private partnerships, business improvement districts, tax increment financing, community (re)development districts, parking strategies, urban housing types and mixed-use infill strategies. Some of the team projects will also engage RED 660 students with design studios in the School of Architecture who will collaborate on team projects.

  9. RED 680 - Entrepreneurship: Building a Real Estate Development Company

    In today’s challenging economic conditions, being an entrepreneur is an imperative. And in the business of real estate, it is the norm. The Entrepreneurship in Real Estate course is focused on examining methods and approaches to building a successful real estate business and the different forms it takes. The objective of the course is to prepare the students for determining efficient organizational forms for their business, appropriate partnership structures for their ventures, and innovative ways at approaching their developments. The course is structured as regular lectures integrated with several visits by guest speakers that will include developers, attorneys, bankers, and brokers in an effort to get a real-life prospective on the issues discussed in class.

  10. RED 699 - Capstone Real Estate Development and Urbanism

    The CDD Workshop assists communities with visioning, planning, design and development challenges through the combined resources of faculty and graduate students in real estate, urban design and architecture. We will define the scope of the work in conjunction with the needs of the community, but it can encompass any of the areas of expertise and training received at UM, including: evaluating sites and properties by looking for opportunities and constraints for development (physical as well as land use, real estate, policy, management and other topics), conducting market analyses by examining the potential for redevelopment or re-positioning of properties, performing financial studies and preparing pro formas, evaluating existing codes, plans and regulations, advising on preservation-oriented development, and providing planning, architecture and urban design services.

  11. AAS 490 - Senior Seminar in Africana Studies: Religion and Civic Engagement

    Coming soon…

  12. AMS 101 - Intro to American Studies: Contemporary Issues in the United States

    Coming soon…

  13. AMS 301 - Intro to American National Government

    Examination of the principles, structures, and processes of the national government of the United States. Frequent comparisons made with other countries.

  14. AMS 301 - African-American History to 1877

    The course focuses on the themes of “African retention” and “Black self-assertion” as we examine the history of people of African descent in the United States from African roots through the emergence of the Jim Crow era. A community-based project, such as volunteer work with the Black Archives, Miami Workers Center, Alonzo Mourning Charities or some other community service organization, may be done in lieu of a research paper.  A ten-page (10) written summary must be submitted on completion of the project.  A supervisor must provide written confirmation that you devoted at least 40 hours to the program.

  15. AMS 301 - Race and Ethnic Relations

    The influence of racial distinctions on individual and social behavior. This course has a substantial Miami focus.  The course content will address how race relations have altered in the context of deindustrialization and rising poverty rates in areas such as Overtown and Liberty City within the Miami city limits.

  16. AMS 301 - “The Sixties”

    This course presents the culture and history of the 1960s in the United States through writings, film, music, and the experiences of faculty members who participated in important events during this era of major conflict and change.  The course title appears in quotation marks because we are less concerned about the precise time frame than in evoking the atmosphere of a period associated with the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, the Antiwar Movement, widespread college campus activism, urban unrest, and the Women’s Movement.  We also will address how the sciences played a role in 1960s culture—this was a decade when anxiety about nuclear war was prominent, the Space Race was in full swing, and concerns about ecology became widespread.  The course format will be a blend of lecture, discussion, film screenings, and panel presentations of first-hand accounts by eyewitnesses to events of the 1960s. Additionally, as part of our effort to make connections between the ideas and events of the 1960s and contemporary life outside the academy, we will offer students the option to fulfill part of the course requirements through service-learning work in a variety of settings away from the U.M. campus. There will be no effort to exclude anyone of any political persuasion either past or present.  Indeed, opposing points of view are encouraged.  We think that something as complex and multifaceted as “The Sixties” requires a range of personal perspectives and interpretations, for even today the era of “The Sixties” provokes passionate responses from those who were there as well as those who were not.

  17. AMS 350 - History and Culture of South Florida: From Swamp to Swamped

    Following the “city as school” methodology, the course combines an overview of library and online resources about Florida and Miami with explorations of the “hands-on” learning opportunities in the Miami area. The course will enable students to shape their own research questions within the broad topics of Florida history and South Florida in historical and cultural perspective. Weekly blog posts will provide ample student interaction. The goal of the course is to pose significant questions about the culture, politics, and economics of contemporary Florida and to use this vibrant and unique regional history to shape and further debate about creative answers to contemporary issues. For example: does the Florida experience provide useful direction for economic revitalization? At the end of the course, each student will have posed a significant question and planned a research project about contemporary Miami or Florida that can be addressed at least in part by reference to historical resources. The course will serve as an introduction to Florida and the Miami metropolitan area for some and provide indigenous Miamians and Floridians with new ways to think about their home and its future.

  18. AMS 350 - The 2012 Elections

    An interdisciplinary approach to the 2012 elections. Topics include voter turnout, campaign strategy, racial politics, and voting laws.

  19. AMS 401 - Nature and the Environment in American History

    For the term paper (15-20 pages), students conduct original research, using both primary and secondary sources, including readings from class. Students select some aspect of environmental history in South Florida to study. They work closely with Special Collections at Richter Library to identify topics and sources to analyze the role of nature in the growth of South Florida. They also meet with local organizations to identify pressing environmental issues in South Florida.

  20. AMS 401 - Civic Activism in Modern Miami: Oral History & Practical Experience

    This course will provide real life experience through interaction with leading local officials and non-profit advocates, examining housing and the culture of resource management and land use in South Florida. Students will examine the Miami area’s environmental and social history, local politics, and organizational effectiveness. Through panel discussions, visiting experts, oral history, completing an internship with a local agency, producing short documentaries and expanding and reorganizing an existing website, www.FloridaCommunityStudies.org, students will gain practical experience in non-profit advocacy, public communications and modes of social change and policy implementation.

  21. AMS 401 - Planning the American Metropolis: History of Cities

    This course will examine the rise of cities throughout American history, with an emphasis on growth and development in the 19th and 20th centuries.  We will focus on the layout of cities; the role of architectural styles in shaping both national and regional identities; the development of commercial and manufacturing districts, entertainment and vice areas; the rise of urban segregation; the growth of suburbs; the emergence of the global city; and the impact of urban growth on the environment. The course will address a variety of factors that have shaped American cities, including landscape, aesthetics, politics, economics, class, race, gender, and region.  Thus we will relate discussions of the built environment with broader concerns about shaping democratic public spheres; providing adequate shelter, transportation, and entertainment for residents; fostering capitalist growth; and establishing a sense of place. In addition to providing students with an introduction to American planning history, a major goal of this course is to help students understand how historical understanding can help inform present-day practice.  Students will learn how many of the planning issues we discuss from a national and historical perspective have manifested themselves locally in South Florida.  Students will then have the opportunity to work collaboratively with a local community organization that addresses some aspect of planning, urban development, and design in Miami. The final project for the class will be the result of this experiential learning assignment and will take the form of a creative or scholarly project for evaluation. Additional assignments include weekly reading and discussion and two short analytic papers.

  22. AMS 401 - Civic Participation and Democracy

    In this course we examine these various mechanisms of “civic participation”, and discuss the meaning and consequences of participatory democracy. The course focuses on the contemporary United States, but we will devote some time to discuss civic participation in other countries as well. Students will perform an in-depth study of how a specific group of citizens expresses their civic voice.

  23. AMS 501 - Senior Research Project

    All majors must complete either an individual research project or an internship at a local cultural or civic institution. For the research option, students identify an appropriate faculty member to supervise and grade the project, and then obtain approval from the program director before proceeding with the project. For the internship option, students partner with any number of local institutions and produce a creative and/or scholarly project for evaluation. The internship will be arranged through the program director, in consultation with the Butler Center. The final product will be evaluated by the program director.

  24. APY 202 - Principals of Cultural Anthropology

    Cultural anthropology, including such topics as economics, politics, kinship and families, health systems, religion, and personality.

  25. APY 398 - Conservation in Practice

    Intersection between economic development, science and conservation in one of the world’s most pristine and fragile ecosystems. Exploration of how tourism offers an alternative to unsustainable fisheries that once drove the local economy, yet has created a new set of pressures on the people and the environment.  Mitigation efforts, science, and international conservation mesh with an understanding of local politics, customs and cultures. Prerequisite: BIL 432 or permission of instructor.

  26. APY 405 - Political Ecology of the Galapagos

    This Field course in the Galapagos National Park offers a rare chance to examine the human interactions in this highly politicized landscape of conservation. Students practice the ecology approach for doing ethnographic fieldwork and explore how this approach can lead to wiser resource management. Semester-in-Residence programs also include home-stay and volunteer components.

  27. APY 418/419 - Politics of the Past

    The past is not dead and buried. Rather, it shapes the lives of contemporary peoples in ways that are powerful and politically charged. With that being said, however, the sociopolitics of the present-day often inform reconstructions of the past. Politics of the Past, then, will examine the intersection of archaeology, politics, capitalism, and discrimination to consider the presentation, misconstrual, revision, and reclamation of the past. How, for instance, have governments used (or abused) archaeology to build nations and reinforce their own positions of power? Is cultural heritage as collateral damage ever justifiable? What does material culture communicate about class conflicts and consumerism? Can the integration of feminist and queer perspectives, which are born from political activism, produce a past free of presentist notions about sex, gender, and sexuality? How have the long disenfranchised—indigenes, ethnic and racial minorities—co-opted the past for their own identity politicking? Lecturing will be kept to a minimum, as the bulk of the class will be devoted to discussion and debate. This course invites student to engage with social theories born of political activism and social justice movements (e.g., critical race theory, feminism, queer studies, postcolonial theory, Marxism). In so doing, students’ critical thinking is honed and civic responsibility fostered. Rather than think about archaeology as concerned with the ancient and exotic, students are challenged to query the relevance of the past in the present and future. Doing archaeology is then an effective tool for instigating positive social change. One issue of pertinence to the south Florida community we will consider is the Miami Circle archaeological site in Downtown Miami. We will visit the site, reflect on its discovery and significance, consider complications arising from its investigation and conservation, and examine its presentation to the public.

  28. APY 505 - Museum Internship

    This course is designed to provide hands on experience in a professional museum setting for students who are considering a career in anthropology or related disciplines. In order to fully appreciate the challenges faced by museums in the 21st century, this course begins with an overview of basic issues facing museums such as funding and collections management. This classroom time is followed by an approximately 10 week internship in one of four Miami museums. Over the course of the semester students will be expected to engage with current literature on the ethics of collecting, representation of and collaboration with indigenous peoples, and the obligation of museums to serve the public. An internship with a trained museum professional is the best way to experience this important arena where scholarship and public education intersect. The University of Miami has long term agreements with a number of Miami museums to place upper level undergraduates in a way that benefits both the students and the museums.

  29. BIL 433 - Conservation in Practice

    Intersection between economic development, science and conservation in one of the world’s most pristine and fragile ecosystems. Exploration of how tourism offers an alternative to unsustainable fisheries that once drove the local economy, yet has created a new set of pressures on the people and the environment.  Mitigation efforts, science, and international conservation mesh with an understanding of local politics, customs and cultures. Prerequisite: BIL 432 or permission of instructor.

  30. BIL 495 - Projects in Biology: Community Outreach

    Throughout the term, students will engage in civic activities identified in consultation with the people, government and public health facilities of the small, rural village of Villamil, the sole habitation on Isla Isabela. This course is part of the UGalapagos semester. Students spend one (Fall) semester in the Galapagos islands, and live with a Galapagos family for the duration of the program. They take sequential courses covering anthropology, ecology, and conservation, and develop a community service project related to any or all of these topics in consultation with the people of the local community.

  31. BIL 495/496/497 - Research Credits

    Individual, original laboratory or field research supervised by a member of the department faculty and concluded by a formal written report. Students can elect to conduct community-based research involving local conservation issues.

  32. BIL 495 - UGalapagos: Civic Engagement in the Galapagos

    Throughout the term, students will engage in civic activities identified in consultation with the people, government and public health facilities of the small, rural village of Villamil, the sole habitation on Isla Isabela.

  33. ECS 112 - Field Problems in Ecosystem Science and Policy

    Problem solving in ecology and environmental management. Class projects and case studies providing experience in identifying problems, quantifying scientific issues and considering management options and outcomes. Extensive field experience.

  34. ECS 310 - Sustainable Living

    Sustainable Living explores ways of living that can be sustained for thousands of years, without further damage to earth, ocean and atmosphere. Topics covered include renewable energy, agricultural practices, water issues, green building, low carbon transportation and healthy living/eating. Students advocate for sustainable practices of their choice in writing and in oral/visual presentations. Frequent field trips.

  35. ECS 372 - Tourism and Conservation (Bocas del Toro, Panama)

    The theme of this course will focus on environmental planning in a relatively pristine coastal region of Panama that is experiencing rapid growth due to tourism development. Participants meet weekly during the spring semester to prepare for the course and then after the spring intercession to present research results. This travel course provides a truly unique opportunity for our students to develop practical field experience in a region that is an ideal laboratory for studying the conflict and tensions between coastal conservation and development. During the week in Bocas del Toro, students will learn from local experts in municipal land use, environmentalism, coastal conservation, and commercial fishing. They will also be given the chance to work within the community to develop a small research and/or community engagement project.

  36. ECS 372/572 - Environmental Filmmaking & Community Engagement

    Students will develop the skills necessary to create short, nonfiction pieces that actively explore, critique, and expand on what makes an environmental documentary film. Students will also learn how the inhabitants of a community, including its residents, educators, leaders, activists, farmers, and others can use their films to engage and empower elected officials, parents, students, youth and others in addressing the environmental and social challenges facing diverse groups.

  37. ECS 375 - Nature and the Environment in American History

    For the term paper (15-20 pages), students conduct original research, using both primary and secondary sources, including readings from class. Students select some aspect of environmental history in South Florida to study. They work closely with Special Collections at Richter Library to identify topics and sources to analyze the role of nature in the growth of South Florida. They also meet with local organizations to identify pressing environmental issues in South Florida.

  38. ECS 401 - Internship

    Students selecting the internship will be required to spend a minimum of 120 contact hours working in an outside firm or agency whose mission is to address environmental issues where science and policy intersect.

  39. ECS 405 - Applied Research in ECS

    Faculty-mentored applied research in environmental topics. Projects in natural ecosystems, sustainable design and business, and communication of environmental issues.

  40. ECS 405 - Political Ecology of the Galapagos

    This Field course in the Galapagos National Park offers a rare chance to examine the human interactions in this highly politicized landscape of conservation. Students practice the ecology approach for doing ethnographic fieldwork and explore how this approach can lead to wiser resource management. Semester-in-Residence programs also include home-stay and volunteer components.

  41. ECS 405 - UGalapagos: Civic Engagement in the Galapagos

    Throughout the term, students will engage in civic activities identified in consultation with the people, government and public health facilities of the small, rural village of Villamil, the sole habitation on Isla Isabela.

  42. ECS 433 - Conservation in Practice

    Intersection between economic development, science and conservation in one of the world’s most pristine and fragile ecosystems. Exploration of how tourism offers an alternative to unsustainable fisheries that once drove the local economy, yet has created a new set of pressures on the people and the environment.  Mitigation efforts, science, and international conservation mesh with an understanding of local politics, customs and cultures. Prerequisite: BIL 432 or permission of instructor.

  43. ENG 209 - Creative Writing

    Analysis and writing of short stories and poems. Required community project in partnership with Mays Conservatory of the Arts.

  44. ENG 214 - American Literature II

    Selected American authors from the Civil War to the present. Satisfies writing requirement.

  45. ENG 230 - Advanced Business Communication

    Professional writing with critical attention to complex rhetorical situations. Practice in formal and informal written communication styles. In the past, over several semesters, different sections worked with Camillus House to (a) analyze website and make recommendations for changes, (b) create and recommend an e-mail policy for the organization, or (c) propose expansion of services. In Spring 2012 there is a required community project in partnership with Mays Conservatory of the Arts.

  46. ENG 365 - Literature of the Holocaust

    Literature relating to the Nazi genocide and its aftermath. Offered in conjunction with the Judaic Studies Program Holocaust Survivors Service Internship.  Please call (305) 284-8180 for additional information.

  47. ENG 395 - “The Sixties”

    This course presents the culture and history of the 1960s in the United States through writings, film, music, and the experiences of faculty members who participated in important events during this era of major conflict and change.  The course title appears in quotation marks because we are less concerned about the precise time frame than in evoking the atmosphere of a period associated with the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, the Antiwar Movement, widespread college campus activism, urban unrest, and the Women’s Movement.  We also will address how the sciences played a role in 1960s culture—this was a decade when anxiety about nuclear war was prominent, the Space Race was in full swing, and concerns about ecology became widespread.  The course format will be a blend of lecture, discussion, film screenings, and panel presentations of first-hand accounts by eyewitnesses to events of the 1960s. Additionally, as part of our effort to make connections between the ideas and events of the 1960s and contemporary life outside the academy, we will offer students the option to fulfill part of the course requirements through service-learning work in a variety of settings away from the U.M. campus. There will be no effort to exclude anyone of any political persuasion either past or present.  Indeed, opposing points of view are encouraged.  We think that something as complex and multifaceted as “The Sixties” requires a range of personal perspectives and interpretations, for even today the era of “The Sixties” provokes passionate responses from those who were there as well as those who were not.

  48. ENG 395 - Special Topics – Civil Rights in Miami

    Content varies by semester. In the past, each student completed a final research paper on some aspect of race relations in Miami during the 60s and 70s. Guest speakers who were involved in the civil rights movement in Miami were also filmed, and the tapes donated to the Richter Library.

  49. GEG 511 - UStellenbosch: Engaging South Africa

    UM is offering a 35-day course in South Africa, team-taught by UM and Stellenbosch faculty. Based on-campus at Stellenbosch University, one of the top universities in Africa, the course includes 11 days of travel to locations across South Africa and a service learning experience in an impoverished community outside Cape Town. Stellenbosch University is located only 50 km from Cape Town in the picturesque foothills of the Drakenstein Mountains.  Field visits include the Cape of Good Hope, Johannesburg, Soweto, the Cradle of Humankind, Robben Island, and Kruger National Park. Service learning will provide students with opportunities to demonstrate their global citizenship through community service. Students will engage with Stellenbosch University’s community projects, work with community leaders, and develop leadership and group skills in working as a team member in service learning assignments.

  50. GEG 523 - Seminar in Urban Management

    Identification of and responses to urban problems in large cities in European and Latin American metropolitan areas. Emphasis is on demographic, cultural/ethnic, service-provision, environmental, transportation, and land-use problems. Approach is via case studies, theory applications, and planning practicalities.

  51. HIS 209 - African-American History to 1877

    The course focuses on the themes of “African retention” and “Black self-assertion” as we examine the history of people of African descent in the United States from African roots through the emergence of the Jim Crow era. A community-based project, such as volunteer work with the Black Archives, Miami Workers Center, Alonzo Mourning Charities or some other community service organization, may be done in lieu of a research paper. A ten-page (10) written summary must be submitted on completion of the project. A supervisor must provide written confirmation that you devoted at least 40 hours to the program.

  52. HIS 210 - The African-American Experience, 1877-Present

    History of people of African descent in the United States from 1877 to present. The course has a community service option to substitute for an essay.

  53. HIS 300 - The African Diaspora in South Florida

    This course examines the historical experiences of the African Diaspora in South Florida through a close analysis of three junctures in the history of the Black experience: The slave trade, abolition, and emancipation; the migration of various African-descended peoples from the Caribbean, Latin America, Central America; and the increasing addition of people from the African continent itself. In lieu of a final project, students can volunteer or intern with a community or community organization and submit a 3-5 page report on their community involvement as their final paper.

  54. HIS 367 - “The Sixties”

    This course presents the culture and history of the 1960s in the United States through writings, film, music, and the experiences of faculty members who participated in important events during this era of major conflict and change.  The course title appears in quotation marks because we are less concerned about the precise time frame than in evoking the atmosphere of a period associated with the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, the Antiwar Movement, widespread college campus activism, urban unrest, and the Women’s Movement.  We also will address how the sciences played a role in 1960s culture—this was a decade when anxiety about nuclear war was prominent, the Space Race was in full swing, and concerns about ecology became widespread.  The course format will be a blend of lecture, discussion, film screenings, and panel presentations of first-hand accounts by eyewitnesses to events of the 1960s. Additionally, as part of our effort to make connections between the ideas and events of the 1960s and contemporary life outside the academy, we will offer students the option to fulfill part of the course requirements through service-learning work in a variety of settings away from the U.M. campus. There will be no effort to exclude anyone of any political persuasion either past or present.  Indeed, opposing points of view are encouraged.  We think that something as complex and multifaceted as “The Sixties” requires a range of personal perspectives and interpretations, for even today the era of “The Sixties” provokes passionate responses from those who were there as well as those who were not.

  55. HIS 368 - Nature and the Environment in American History

    For the term paper (15-20 pages), students conduct original research, using both primary and secondary sources, including readings from class. Students select some aspect of environmental history in South Florida to study. They work closely with Special Collections at Richter Library to identify topics and sources to analyze the role of nature in the growth of South Florida. They also meet with local organizations to identify pressing environmental issues in South Florida.

  56. HIS 373 - The Civil Rights Movement

    This course explores the modern Civil Rights Movement was one of the profound occurrences in the history of the United States of America. In many respects the movement reshaped the nation, from politics and the economy to social relations and cultural values. Required academic service-learning component.

  57. HIS 381 - History and Culture of South Florida: From Swamp to Swamped

    Following the “city as school” methodology, the course combines an overview of library and online resources about Florida and Miami with explorations of the “hands-on” learning opportunities in the Miami area. The course will enable students to shape their own research questions within the broad topics of Florida history and South Florida in historical and cultural perspective. Weekly blog posts will provide ample student interaction. The goal of the course is to pose significant questions about the culture, politics, and economics of contemporary Florida and to use this vibrant and unique regional history to shape and further debate about creative answers to contemporary issues. For example: does the Florida experience provide useful direction for economic revitalization? At the end of the course, each student will have posed a significant question and planned a research project about contemporary Miami or Florida that can be addressed at least in part by reference to historical resources. The course will serve as an introduction to Florida and the Miami metropolitan area for some and provide indigenous Miamians and Floridians with new ways to think about their home and its future.

  58. HIS 565 - Civic Activism in Modern Miami: Oral History & Practical Experience

    This course will provide real life experience through interaction with leading local officials and non-profit advocates, examining housing and the culture of resource management and land use in South Florida. Students will examine the Miami area’s environmental and social history, local politics, and organizational effectiveness. Through panel discussions, visiting experts, oral history, completing an internship with a local agency, producing short documentaries and expanding and reorganizing an existing website, www.FloridaCommunityStudies.org, students will gain practical experience in non-profit advocacy, public communications and modes of social change and policy implementation.

  59. HIS 561 - Consumer Culture & the Erosion of Public Space in American History

    Coming soon…

  60. HIS 561 - Voices in Transit: Oral History in Modern Miami

    This course will provide opportunities for students to examine the history of modern Miami while experiencing and learning about the range and value of oral history interviews. Students will complete two oral history interviews related to (1) one of five topics and (2) another one related to one of five communities. An ongoing service learning component with paper/reflection will also involve brief internships in a specific local non-profit agency or government department related to the topics and communities.

  61. HIS 561 - Planning the American Metropolis: History of Cities

    This course will examine the rise of cities throughout American history, with an emphasis on growth and development in the 19th and 20th centuries.  We will focus on the layout of cities; the role of architectural styles in shaping both national and regional identities; the development of commercial and manufacturing districts, entertainment and vice areas; the rise of urban segregation; the growth of suburbs; the emergence of the global city; and the impact of urban growth on the environment. The course will address a variety of factors that have shaped American cities, including landscape, aesthetics, politics, economics, class, race, gender, and region.  Thus we will relate discussions of the built environment with broader concerns about shaping democratic public spheres; providing adequate shelter, transportation, and entertainment for residents; fostering capitalist growth; and establishing a sense of place. In addition to providing students with an introduction to American planning history, a major goal of this course is to help students understand how historical understanding can help inform present-day practice.  Students will learn how many of the planning issues we discuss from a national and historical perspective have manifested themselves locally in South Florida.  Students will then have the opportunity to work collaboratively with a local community organization that addresses some aspect of planning, urban development, and design in Miami. The final project for the class will be the result of this experiential learning assignment and will take the form of a creative or scholarly project for evaluation. Additional assignments include weekly reading and discussion and two short analytic papers.

  62. HIS 569 - Studies in African-American History: Black Protest Thought

    Throughout the history of Black folk in America, there has been a wide range of thought about what should be the right course of action or agenda for the race.  The thinking has ranged the gamut from the advocacy of freedom “By Any Means Necessary” to accommodation and integration, to the building of a separate Black nation within America, to the Back-to-Africa Movements.  This seminar will probe the thinking and formulations of those Black leaders. A community-based project, such as volunteer work with the Black Archives, Miami Workers Center, Alonzo Mourning Charities or some other community service organization, may be done in lieu of the research paper. A ten-page (10) written summary must be submitted on completion of the project. A supervisor must provide written confirmation that you devoted at least 40 hours to the program.

  63. Intersession - Challenges in Sustainable Development in Haiti: from Theory to Practice (Intersession)

    The intersession course Sustainable Development Challenges in Haiti will allow students to move from theory to practice through a combination of readings, lectures, meetings, and direct participation in the construction of an ecological sanitation system with the organization SOIL. The readings and lectures will take an interdisciplinary look at the connections between poverty, public health and the environment in Haiti. Students will be encouraged to look holistically at environmental and public health problems from a human rights perspective, examining the role that inequality has played in creating and maintaining health and environmental crises in Haiti.

  64. INS 321 - Political Ecology of the Galapagos

    This Field course in the Galapagos National Park offers a rare chance to examine the human interactions in this highly politicized landscape of conservation. Students practice the ecology approach for doing ethnographic fieldwork and explore how this approach can lead to wiser resource management. Semester-in-Residence programs also include home-stay and volunteer components.

  65. INS 411 - UStellenbosch: Engaging South Africa

    UM is offering a 35-day course in South Africa, team-taught by UM and Stellenbosch faculty. Based on-campus at Stellenbosch University, one of the top universities in Africa, the course includes 11 days of travel to locations across South Africa and a service learning experience in an impoverished community outside Cape Town. Stellenbosch University is located only 50 km from Cape Town in the picturesque foothills of the Drakenstein Mountains. Field visits include the Cape of Good Hope, Johannesburg, Soweto, the Cradle of Humankind, Robben Island, and Kruger National Park. Service learning will provide students with opportunities to demonstrate their global citizenship through community service. Students will engage with Stellenbosch University’s community projects, work with community leaders, and develop leadership and group skills in working as a team member in service learning assignments.

  66. INS 522 - Latin American Political Economy (Intersession)

    Participants will learn how a rural community suffers and recovers from natural disasters amidst the normal conditions of extreme poverty. Students will learn about economic development in a rural setting and those factors that keep a community poor. This five-week summer the program will expand its Ica work to include the two other communities in the Canyon which have been innovative in drip irrigation techniques for low-income farmers. Students will engage in manual work to contribute to the village recovery. Students will engage in projects such as working on the village’s water system, tilling the soil, milking cows, harvesting cotton, and cementing drainage ditches. In earning the villagers’ confidence, students will be able then to investigate the economic foundations of the community and the roots of poverty on the fringe of one of the most affluent agro-export valleys of Peru.

  67. INS 522 - Conservation in Practice

    Intersection between economic development, science and conservation in one of the world’s most pristine and fragile ecosystems. Exploration of how tourism offers an alternative to unsustainable fisheries that once drove the local economy, yet has created a new set of pressures on the people and the environment.  Mitigation efforts, science, and international conservation mesh with an understanding of local politics, customs and cultures. Prerequisite: BIL 432 or permission of instructor.

  68. INS 595/599 - Global Health & Development: Harnessing the Theoretical with Practical Experience

    This course will expose students to the indigenous Kuna health, economic, political, social, cultural and environmental aspects of their life and consider the different perspectives of international development. Island activities will include such things as: Visiting and participating in programs with the heath center, a school, and more.

  69. JUS 206 - Holocaust Survivors Support Internship Program (HSSIP)

    Students enrolled in this program provide valuable services to Jewish survivors of Nazi atrocities while developing their leadership abilities and giving them an appreciation for the historical significance of the Holocaust. Student participants are matched with local survivors, whom they visit for 4 to 5 times each semester for a commitment of 2 semesters. Students also meet as a group 4 to 5 times each semester for academic enrichment activities. Students receive 3 JUS or REL credits for their participation, and are eligible, depending on the number of visits, for a stipend of up to $250 per semester towards travel expenses. Outstanding interns may be eligible for a Sue Miller Scholarship subject to the availability of funds. Open to all students across campus.

  70. JUS 421 - Human Rights and Otherness

    Special projects in religious or historical traditions. Students did oral histories as part of the course last fall as a part of the Sephardi Voices project.

  71. LAS 302/503 - The Environment & Culture of the Galapagos: Writing, Research, & Critical Thinking

    This is a course of total immersion in the environment and culture of the Galapagos Islands. It is a course in writing, research and analytical thinking that capitalizes on the distinctive characteristics of the Galapagos. It is designed to benefit students across a wide range of disciplines. This course delivers both the key concepts in understanding and engaging the environment and the instruction and practice to make every participant a better writer. Tweeting and blogging are integral parts of this course. Students will have opportunities to write for several internet operations including the University of Miami’s environmental magazine on the internet, OneWater.org, which Professor Treaster edits. Other opportunities for writing for publication may develop. Summer-in-Residence programs also include home-stay and volunteer components.

  72. LAS 302/504 - Tourism and Conservation (Bocas del Toro, Panama)

    The theme of this course will focus on environmental planning in a relatively pristine coastal region of Panama that is experiencing rapid growth due to tourism development. Participants meet weekly during the spring semester to prepare for the course and then after the spring intercession to present research results. This travel course provides a truly unique opportunity for our students to develop practical field experience in a region that is an ideal laboratory for studying the conflict and tensions between coastal conservation and development. During the week in Bocas del Toro, students will learn from local experts in municipal land use, environmentalism, coastal conservation, and commercial fishing. They will also be given the chance to work within the community to develop a small research and/or community engagement project.

  73. LAS 302/503 - Field Methods for Socio-Environmental Research – Galapagos, Ecuador

    This field methods course takes place in the Galapagos and engages students with the local socio-environmental issues of Puerto Villamil and other small, host communities. Course participants will acquire the rudiments of fieldwork research through exposure to widely used methods and actual generation of primary data attuned to local issues. Students will be introduced to the socio-economic, cultural, political, and institutional realities of Latin America and particularly environmentally sensitive sites in the region. A Semester-in-Residence program also includes home-stay and volunteer/community engagement components.

  74. LAS 302 - Guatemala – Its Land, Culture, and Religion

    This course introduces the contemporary context of Guatemalan culture and identity through the lens of Religious Studies. Special attention is given to the role of culture, class, social location, and historical context in Christianity and Mayan religion in Guatemala. The course content will draw heavily from the local context in San Lucas Tolimán and the contemporary and historical religious landscape of Guatemala. This is a service-learning course that integrates course material with student service placements. Students will learn about and have an opportunity to research and work in: coffee collectives, a women’s center, a school, construction sites, and ecological reforestation projects.

  75. LAS 505 - Internship in Latin American and Caribbean Studies

    Course credit for on-site experience in a business, government, or non-profit organization dealing with Latin America and the Caribbean.

  76. POL 201 - Intro to American National Government

    Examination of the principles, structures, and processes of the national government of the United States. Frequent comparisons made with other countries.

  77. POL 300 - The Politics of Growth Management

    An analysis of growth management policies and techniques. Topics include urban environmental issues, development of growth management policies, and growth management planning techniques.

  78. POL 334 - Campaigns

    This course is intended to provide an overview of campaigns and elections in the United States for political science majors and non-majors with an interest in understanding elections, campaigns, and voting in the United States.  We will cover the institutions governing voting, political communication, public opinion, political participation, and political behavior. The primary course objective is for you to gain a greater understanding of campaigns and elections, American style. This necessarily includes an in-depth understanding of the when, where, why, how and to what effect candidates, media, and voters shape strategies and outcomes. Specifically, by the end of this course, you should: Understand the reasons why individuals choose to participate or not to participate in the American political process. Understand the basic set up of the United States electoral system and how it influences outcomes. Understand the interactions among candidates, media and voters in the context of political campaigns. Become knowledgeable consumers of political information generally and campaign information specifically. With Election Day occurring in the middle of the semester, you have the opportunity to experience the campaign and election first-hand – and as more than a voter.  Your assignment is to participate in Election Day as a campaign volunteer or county poll-worker for a minimum of 5 hours – although my hope is that you will embrace a full day experience. This hands-on experience is in lieu of class on Tuesday and any assigned reading that week (except campaign tracking and reading general political news), so it should not be onerous. You may work for any candidate, party, ballot measure committee, or civic organization engaged in campaign or voter mobilization work, or you may sign up to work for the Miami-Dade Elections Department at www.miamidade.gov/elections//employment_poll-worker-info.asp or you may sign-up in another county.

  79. POL 400 - The 2012 Elections

    An interdisciplinary approach to the 2012 elections. Topics include voter turnout, campaign strategy, racial politics, and voting laws.

  80. POL 501 - Budget and Financial Management and Administration

    Role of the budget in shaping public policy; managing public revenues; budgetary theory, politics, and fiscal management. Examples from state, municipal and federal governments.

  81. POL 520 - Internship

    Provides advanced political science majors with an opportunity to participate in a structured, supervised internship. 25-35 page research paper required. Students may opt to intern with campaigns.

  82. POL 531 - Global Environmental Politics

    Examination of the environment within the context of economic globalization. Contrasts the international trading regime and those regimes designed to protect the environment, with specific attention to the issues of global warming and bio-diversity.

  83. POL 548 - Civic Participation and Democracy

    In this course we examine these various mechanisms of “civic participation”, and discuss the meaning and consequences of participatory democracy. The course focuses on the contemporary United States, but we will devote some time to discuss civic participation in other countries as well. Students will perform an in-depth study of how a specific group of citizens expresses their civic voice.

  84. POL 656 - Public Service Internship

    Individual on-the-job work experience; arranged and monitored by a faculty member.

  85. PSY 120 - Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Freshman Forum.  Students conduct a classroom observation of a child within an early childhood classroom or school in the community.

  86. PSY 203 - Child and Adolescent Development

    Survey of significant aspects of growth and development throughout the lifespan. Emphasis placed on childhood and adolescence.

  87. PSY 203 - Child and Adolescent Psychology

    Students conduct a classroom observation of a child within an early childhood classroom or school in the community.

  88. PSY 340 - The Psychology of Thinking and Learning in Children

    Development of perception, thought, and language processes throughout the lifespan with an emphasis on early and middle childhood.

  89. PSY 367/368 - Introduction to Research Projects

    Students assist on a research project in psychology under supervision of a faculty member. Activities include library research, data collection and management, and attendance at research team meetings.

  90. REL 406 - UStellenbosch: Engaging South Africa

    UM is offering a 35-day course in South Africa, team-taught by UM and Stellenbosch faculty. Based on-campus at Stellenbosch University, one of the top universities in Africa, the course includes 11 days of travel to locations across South Africa and a service learning experience in an impoverished community outside Cape Town. Stellenbosch University is located only 50 km from Cape Town in the picturesque foothills of the Drakenstein Mountains.  Field visits include the Cape of Good Hope, Johannesburg, Soweto, the Cradle of Humankind, Robben Island, and Kruger National Park. Service learning will provide students with opportunities to demonstrate their global citizenship through community service. Students will engage with Stellenbosch University’s community projects, work with community leaders, and develop leadership and group skills in working as a team member in service learning assignments.

  91. REL 408 - Human Rights and Otherness

    Special projects in religious or historical traditions. Students did oral histories as part of the course last fall as a part of the Sephardi Voices project.

  92. REL 409 - Human Rights, Religion, & Refugees Arab World

    Coming soon…

  93. REL 409 - Holocaust Survivors Support Internship Program (HSSIP)

    Students enrolled in this program provide valuable services to Jewish survivors of Nazi atrocities while developing their leadership abilities and giving them an appreciation for the historical significance of the Holocaust. Student participants are matched with local survivors, whom they visit for 4 to 5 times each semester for a commitment of 2 semesters. Students also meet as a group 4 to 5 times each semester for academic enrichment activities. Students receive 3 JUS or REL credits for their participation, and are eligible, depending on the number of visits, for a stipend of up to $250 per semester towards travel expenses. Outstanding interns may be eligible for a Sue Miller Scholarship subject to the availability of funds. Open to all students across campus.

  94. REL 409 - Religion and Civic Engagement

    This course will explore the manner in which religion is a driving force behind civic engagement in the United States. Issues that will be covered include immigration, gender, law, youth, religious pluralism, and racism. This is a service-learning course that will integrate course material with student service placements. Students will be required to do service learning throughout the semester. If you have any questions about REL 409, please contact Dr. Maldonado at mmaldonado@miami.edu.

  95. REL 409 - Guatemala – Its Land, Culture, and Religion

    This course introduces the contemporary context of Guatemalan culture and identity through the lens of Religious Studies. Special attention is given to the role of culture, class, social location, and historical context in Christianity and Mayan religion in Guatemala. The course content will draw heavily from the local context in San Lucas Tolimán and the contemporary and historical religious landscape of Guatemala. This is a service-learning course that integrates course material with student service placements. Students will learn about and have an opportunity to research and work in: coffee collectives, a women’s center, a school, construction sites, and ecological reforestation projects.

  96. SOC 303 - Social Inequalities

    Social ranking by class, status, and power. Stratification by age, sex or minority group membership. This course has a substantial Miami focus. The course content will address how socioeconomic inequality has altered in the context of deindustrialization and rising poverty rates in areas such as Overtown and Liberty City within the Miami city limits.

  97. SOC 365 - Internship

    The Department of Sociology’s Internship Program provides valuable exposure to and insight into the operations of community non-profit or government based social service agencies. More specifically, this “field education” program enables students to: integrate classroom knowledge and theories with work experience in the community; critically analyze the limitations of sociological practice; and build working relationships to enhance their ability to obtain employment in their chosen profession upon graduation. Previous participating internship agencies have included: CHARLEE; Department of Juvenile Justice; Empowered Youth; His House; Miami Dade County Police Department; Miami Dade County State; Attorney’s Office; Miami-Dade County Medical Examiner’s Office; Ronald McDonald House; Kristee House

  98. SOC 387 - Race and Ethnic Relations

    The influence of racial distinctions on individual and social behavior. This course has a substantial Miami focus. The course content will address how race relations have altered in the context of deindustrialization and rising poverty rates in areas such as Overtown and Liberty City within the Miami city limits.

  99. SOC 388 - “The Black Ghetto”

    This course examines the origin and evolution of the “ghetto” as a concept and the social and historical significance of the ghetto in understanding the development of black community life in urban America.

  100. SPA 322 - Archives and Cuban Cultural Studies

    Students work at the Cuban Heritage Collection and with different community theaters in the city in order to create archives of their performance work and develop their pages in the Cuban Theater Digital Archive. Students do oral histories of artists as well and they have served as assistant directors for productions.

University of Miami Civic Engagement Courses

The Civic and Community Engagement Database catalogues the faculty, projects, and courses at the University of Miami engaged with our local, national, and global communities. To find out more about UM’s definition of engaged scholarship, click here.

To use the database, click the “Expand Browse” button in the corner and choose courses, centers, and areas of interest to browse, the click “Filter.” Results are sorted in the “People,” “Projects,” and “Courses” tabs.

Would you like your course or research project to be featured in our database? Email us at civicengagement@miami.edu.