JOURNALISM - Dept. Code: CNJ
http://com.miami.edu/programs


INTRODUCTION
The program in Journalism prepares students to be writers, editors and designers for a variety of media from mainstream and alternative newspapers and magazines to web-based and online media, emphasizing effective storytelling through writing, audio and video recording, and photography. Reporting skills and writing in the context of news, commentary and features are stressed in this area of study. The program enables students to gather information, evaluate and organize that information, and then communicate it through appropriate media. As a result, the program attracts students interested in other fields in which research, analysis and writing are important, such as students planning to apply to law school or other professional or graduate schools.
The program begins with courses that survey the roles of and issues affecting the mass media in general and journalism in particular. In subsequent courses, students mix skills and theory to explore journalism, its values, history, ethics, and legal and regulatory constraints. Journalism majors learn through hands-on practice to conduct research and reporting, to verify facts, exercise news judgment, write against deadlines, edit, practice ethical decision-making, and adhere to press laws and regulations.

Small laboratory classes allow students to practice writing skills in an introductory news writing course, an advanced reporting course and upper-level courses in advanced reporting. Electives include courses in newspaper, magazine, newsletter and online writing and graphics; still photography; audio, video and web production; newspaper, magazine and web editing and design; computer-assisted reporting and the Internet; and global journalism and media. Journalism seniors participate in a news ethics and professional problems seminar to prepare them for on-the-job decision-making. While knowledge of a foreign language may be helpful, the program does not require any foreign language courses.

Students are encouraged to work for The Miami Hurricane, UM’s award-winning, student-run newspaper published twice weekly in print and online; Distraction magazine; Ibis, UM’s yearbook; Communiqué, the School of Communication’s online newspaper; and hyper-local news sites such as Gables Home Page.

Students choose from a range of newspapers, magazines, newsletters and websites published in the Greater Miami-Fort Lauderdale area for internships and part-time employment. Students have been awarded competitive internships from The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, Tribune Newspapers, McClatchy Newspapers and the Poynter Institute, among others.


EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

The educational objectives of the Journalism Program require that:

• Students can locate and gather information, using interpersonal interviewing skills, knowledge about domestic and global information sources and social and institutional information processes, sophisticated reporting techniques, computer skills, and general knowledge and common sense.

• Using knowledge from broad-based liberal arts and science courses and courses in journalism practice, history, law and ethics, students can critically analyze complex information and organize it based on sound reasoning, cultural awareness, and journalistic principles.

• Students can write, visualize and otherwise accurately communicate, with knowledge of grammar, style, and journalistic principles, complex information to diverse mass audiences.

• Students can convey information in traditional and multimedia formats in the context of a dynamic and converging news media environment.


DEGREE PROGRAMS

The Bachelor of Science in Communication degree is offered in the Journalism Program.


MAJOR

A major is offered in Journalism.

Each candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Communication will complete School of Communication requirements including courses in the School’s General Education Required Areas of Study. Journalism majors must also complete a separate minor or a second major in either a second Program of Study within the School or in an academic program outside the School.

Admission to the Journalism major

Before admission as a Journalism (CNJ) major, a student must:

A) Achieve sophomore standing;

B) Complete the four Core courses listed below, in residence at the University, all with grades of C or higher (C- is not acceptable.)

Students who have obtained the written approval of the Chair of Journalism and Media Management to use transfer credit to satisfy one or more requirements of that major may be required to complete additional courses in residence at the University before being admitted to that major.

Upon completion of a student’s first 45 University credits while enrolled in the School of
Communication, all University credits earned toward the major will be used in computing a student’s major cumulative quality point average; only those students with a cumulative average of 2.5 or higher will be admitted to a major.

A student who has completed 45 credits while enrolled in the School of Communication but who has not been admitted to one of the Communication majors may be dismissed from the School. A student who has completed 60 University credits while enrolled in the School but who has not been admitted to one of the Communication majors will be dismissed from the School. See PROBATION AND DISMISSAL.

THE JOURNALISM MAJOR

CORE COURSES

CNJ 111 Introduction to News Media Writing
CVJ 106 Multimedia Design
COM 250 Freedom of Expression and Communication Ethics
CNJ 319 History of Journalism

OTHER REQUIRED COURSES

CNJ 216 News Reporting and Writing
CNJ 303 Mass Media Law
CNJ 444 Public Affairs Reporting
CNJ 461 Seminar in News Ethics and Problems

Beyond the required courses, journalism majors must take at least 18 additional elective credits in journalism (for a total of 42 credits required to graduate with this major.) Some of these credits may be taken in other programs in the School of Communication after prior consultation with and approval by a Journalism faculty advisor. Up to 3 credits of the additional 18 elective credits may consist of internships or practicums.

As a guideline to assist students in pursuing their areas of interest, students may select one of the following tracks of specialization, though students have the option, after consultation with a Journalism faculty advisor, of tailoring their own particular course of study in journalism to suit their interests.

A. The NEWS Track

CVJ 221 Introduction to Documentary Photography
CNJ 444 Public Affairs Reporting
CNJ 445 In-Depth Journalism and Media Convergence

Select at least one of the following courses:
CNJ 513 Computer-Assisted Reporting
CNJ 515 Reporting and the Internet

Select at least one of the following courses:

CNJ 381 Newspaper Editing and Layout
CNJ 442 Online Journalism

B. The MAGAZINE/FEATURES Track

CVJ 221 Introduction to Documentary Photography
CNJ 382 Publication Planning and Editing

Select at least one of the following courses:

CNJ 513 Computer-Assisted Reporting
CNJ 515 Reporting and the Internet
CNJ 442 Online Journalism

Select at least one of the following courses:

CNJ 544 Feature Writing
CNJ 446 Travel Writing

Any additional elective credits from the School of Communication should be chosen with the prior approval of a Journalism faculty advisor.

C. The GLOBAL JOURNALISM Track

CNJ 510 Comparative Media Systems
CNJ 511 Global Media
CNJ 517 International Journalism

Students are encouraged to consider a minor or a second major in Latin American Studies, International Studies, or Comparative Politics. Other disciplines that include a significant international or cross-cultural focus can be discussed with a Journalism faculty advisor.

D. The PUBLICATION DESIGN Track

CVJ 221 Introduction to Documentary Photography
CVJ 341 Web Design

Select at least one of the following courses:

CNJ 381 Newspaper Editing and Layout
CNJ 382 Publication Planning and Editing

E. The DIGITAL NEWS Track

CVJ 106 Multimedia Design
CNJ 442 Online Journalism
CNJ 515 Reporting and the Internet

Select at least one of the following courses:

CEM 435 Telecommunication Systems
CNJ 513 Computer-Assisted Reporting

Select at least one of the following courses:
CVJ 209 Introduction to Multimedia Storytelling
CVJ 221 Introduction to Documentary Photography
CVJ 341 Web Design
CVJ 419 Interactive Storytelling
CVJ 422 Programming for Interactivity

F. The CUSTOM Track

Many students prefer to explore a number of different areas of specialization and build what amounts to a custom track.  These students are required to consult with the Journalism Chair or her designated representative to design a custom track.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE JOURNALISM MAJOR
Students majoring in Journalism must complete three credits in History, three credits in Political Science, and COS 211. These credits may be used to fulfill the School’s General Education Required Areas of Study (see listing above). Any waivers of these requirements must be approved in writing by both the Chair and the Academic Services Office of the School of Communication.


MINOR

The 15 credit minor in Journalism requires:

CNJ 111
CNJ 216
CNJ 303
CNJ 381 or CNJ 382

One of the following courses is also required: CVJ 106, CNJ 319, CNJ 442, CNJ 444, CNJ 461 or CNJ 544.

A grade of C or better is required in all courses (a C- is not acceptable.)

Any waiver of these requirements must be approved in writing by both the Chair and the Academic Services Office of the School of Communication.


DEPARTMENT HONORS

School of Communication students may graduate with School Honors in Communication noted upon their diplomas and transcripts. Students should contact the School’s Office of Admissions, Academic & Alumni Services (2037 Wolfson Building) for details.

Students may receive recognition as graduates cum laude, magna cum laude, or summa cum laude if they meet the requirements set forth under GRADUATION HONORS in this Bulletin.