SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION – GRADUATE
www.com.miami.edu

DEPARTMENTS

The School of Communication offers the Master of Arts in the Department of Communication Studies (M.A. in Communication), the Department of Journalism and Media Management (M.A. in Journalism), the Department of Strategic Communication (M.A. in Public Relations) and the Master of Fine Arts in the Department of Cinema and Interactive Media (M.F.A. in Motion Pictures). The School also offers a Ph.D. in Communication.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Admission to Graduate Studies at the Master’s Level:

Requirements for admission to Graduate Studies for the Master of Arts or Master of Fine Arts degree in Communication are:

• A baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution
• The School’s official application
• A $65.00 non-refundable application fee
• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate college work
• Three letters of recommendation
• Official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores (M.A. applicants only)
• Portfolio (M.F.A. applicants only)
• Official TOEFL scores for international applicants only
• Letter of intent—500 word typed statement of academic and professional goals

Contact the Office of Graduate Studies, 305-284-5236 or socgrad@miami.edu, for information.

Requirements for admission to Graduate Studies for the Juris Doctor/Master of Arts
in Communication Joint degree are:

For Fall 2012

• Applications are due on April 1, 2012 for Fall 2012 matriculation. If students currently enrolled in the J.D. program want to apply to the School of Communication graduate program, the process will be as follows: Admitted students and current 1L students will supply a personal statement attached to an email indicating that they are applying to the joint degree program specifying one of the following three School of Communication M.A. programs: Communication Studies, Public Relations, and Journalism.  This email and a personal statement should be directed to: Sandra Abraham, Executive Liaison for Interdisciplinary Programs, School of Law.

o sabraham@law.miami.edu
o Office: 305-284-4030
o University of Miami, 1320 South Dixie Highway, Suite 731, Coral Gables, FL 33146. 

• The Executive Liaison, working with the Admissions Office, will forward the student’s application, including LSAT score, undergraduate transcript, letters of recommendation (two of them previously required for the J.D. program), and, if applicable, a current Law School transcript to the School of Communication for admission consideration.
• An LSAT score will be considered in lieu of the GRE.
• Students will be admitted to the Law School J.D. program and the School of Communication (SoC) master’s program separately.
• Students in this joint degree program must commence law study first.

For Fall 2013

• Beginning in Fall 2012, students must be admitted to the Law School first, prior to enrollment in the School of Communication, checking a box on their application indicating their interest in the joint degree program.  Once accepted to the Law School, the student’s law school application including LSAT score, undergraduate transcript, and letters of recommendation (two of them required for the J.D. program) will be sent to the School of Communication for review. The student will then receive notification from the School of Communication regarding his/her admission to the joint degree program. 
• An LSAT score may be submitted in lieu of the GRE.

General notes for Fall 2012 and Fall 2013

• Students will be admitted to the Law School J.D. program and the School of Communication (SoC) master’s program separately.
• Students in this joint degree program must commence law study first. (Students who have already commenced work on the M.A. are not eligible for the joint program.)

Admission to Graduate Studies at the Doctoral Level:

Requirements for admission to Graduate Studies for the Doctor of Philosophy in Communication are:

• A master’s degree in communication, or in another appropriate field. The degree must be in addition to a bachelor’s degree. All degrees must be from accredited institutions.
• The School’s official application
• A $65.00 non-refundable application fee
• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate college work
• Three letters of recommendation
• Official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores
• Official TOEFL scores for international applicants only
• Letter of intent – a minimum 500 word typed statement of academic and professional goals
• A copy of the completed master’s thesis or comparable scholarly work if no master’s thesis has been completed. If the master’s thesis is in progress, completed chapters should be submitted.
• Resume

DEGREE PROGRAMS

The School of Communication offers graduate programs leading to the Doctor of Philosophy, Master of Arts and Master of Fine Arts degrees.

COMMUNICATION (Ph.D.) is a highly individualized and innovative program.
Each student is paired after his/her first year of study with a faculty member who assists the student in developing the requisite research techniques, teaching, writing, and media skills necessary for a career in education, media, business, or industry.

Research interests of the School of Communication faculty are diverse. Possible areas
of specialization for doctoral work include intercultural communication, health communication, organizational communication, international communication, political
communication, interpersonal communication, public relations, and mass communication.

COMMUNICATION STUDIES (M.A.) is a program designed to provide students with a rigorous educational experience, to develop an advanced understanding of the human communication process, to increase awareness of the interdisciplinary nature of the communication field, and to develop oral, written, critical thinking, and research skills.  The 30-credit thesis track program emphasizes the student’s development of research skills. The 36-credit non-thesis track program focuses on a theoretical foundation with emphasis on applied communication. Students have the option to concentrate in Communication Studies, Health Communication, or Intercultural Communication.

JOURNALISM (M.A.) is an intensive program of academic study and hands-on practice designed to develop competitive, high-level, cross-platform digital media skills appropriate for today’s media landscape. Students take a common core of courses designed to provide a foundation in all aspects of contemporary journalism (e.g., writing, reporting, multimedia, data visualization, broadcasting, media law and ethics). In addition, students have the opportunity to focus their work in various areas of study, including broadcast journalism, news and feature writing and various aspects of multimedia journalism. Through a combination of journalism courses and related courses offered by other programs, students may also concentrate some of their work in particular areas of interest (e.g., sports reporting, journalism for social change or international journalism). The program begins in the fall semester and lasts for 18 months. No prior training or experience in journalism is required.

PUBLIC RELATIONS (M.A.) offers two programs. The 30-credit thesis track program provides an opportunity to supplement a working foundation and knowledge with pertinent theory and research methodologies. A second non-thesis track program, a 36-credit coursework-only option, builds from a foundation of public relations and communication courses.

JOINT DEGREE JURIS DOCTOR (J.D.)/M.A. IN COMMUNICATION. A powerful background in law and in communication can be a launching pad for a career in law, business, entertainment or government. For this reason, the University of Miami School of Law and School of Communication have brought together these two dynamic fields to offer a joint degree program. Through this joint program, students can acquire a law degree and a master’s degree in communication in less time (3 to 3½ years). The joint degree program is intended for students with a variety of goals including students who plan to practice professionally in a communication field such as journalism or strategic communication with a law-related emphasis. Graduates of these programs may also work as in-house counsel for new communication technology companies, or serve with government agencies concerned with communication law or with law firms practicing in that field. This program also provides a solid foundation for future journalists who wish to report on legal affairs, and offers ideal preparation for the rapidly growing field of public affairs management, in which practitioners work in business, government and non-profits to communicate with key audiences.

The School of Communication M.A. degree programs participating in the joint J.D. program are:
• Communication Studies (Communication Studies, Health Communication, Intercultural Communication)
• Public Relations
• Journalism

MOTION PICTURES (M.F.A.) The Motion Picture graduate program provides a student-centered, learning experience within a globally diverse moving image context. The M.F.A. curriculum emphasizes the relationship between theory and practice and encourages both creative collaboration and independent thinking as it prepares motion picture professionals and artists.  M.F.A. candidates are expected to follow a set sequence of courses during the first two semesters of their studies. During the second year of studies, candidates are strongly encouraged to explore not only a primary but also a secondary area of specialization in the program and develop a minimum of two creative projects consistent with their areas of primary interest and secondary specialization. A minimum of 6 credit hours in each area of specialization is required. Under faculty committee supervision, students will develop one or two creative projects in the third year of their studies. This three-year program culminates with a thesis portfolio that demonstrates, not only skillful execution of craft, but strong conceptual development rooted in collaborative work and innovative uses of technology.
Graduate students are encouraged to pursue independent and critical thinking, research and creative work as appropriate to the fulfillment of the requirements of their degree. In addition, the graduate program seeks to support innovative approaches and ideas and to aid in the pursuit of relevant scholarly and creative endeavors.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Programs of study for the Master of Arts and Master of Fine Arts degrees are available with these options:

MASTER OF ARTS - THESIS TRACK

For programs including a thesis, the candidate must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours at the graduate level with the approval of a faculty advisor. Of the 30 credit hours, 15 credit hours must be at or above the 600 level. Six credit hours will be earned for thesis work. The thesis may represent an applied research project, original research, or a critical review on a topic approved by a thesis committee. The thesis committee chair must be a member of the Graduate Faculty of the University.

A thesis is required for thesis-track Communication Studies and Public Relations students.


MASTER OF ARTS - NON-THESIS TRACK

Students must complete a minimum of 36 credit hours at the graduate level with the approval of a faculty advisor. Of the 36 credit hours, all must be at or above the 500 level, and 15 must be at or above the 600 level.

JURIS DOCTOR/MASTER OF ARTS JOINT DEGREE

This joint degree program will allow 9 J.D. credits to be applied to the M.A. degree and 6 M.A. credits to be applied to the J.D. degree, saving the student 15 credits between the two programs.

In the J.D. program, students will complete 82 credits in the School of Law. Additionally, 6 credits from the School of Communication program will be applied to their Law School transcript, for a total of 88 required J.D. credits. In the M.A. program, students will complete 27 credits in the School of Communication.  Additionally, 9 law school credits will be applied toward their master’s degree, for a total of 36 required M.A. credits. As defined above, 15 credits will be counted toward both degrees: 6 credits from the School of Law and 9 credits from the School of Communication. During the first year of the joint program, students will be required to attend the J.D. program full-time. Students will be able to take courses in the School of Communication beginning in the fall of their 2L year. Students must complete all J.D. requirements and all M.A. requirements as defined by their programs. Participants in the joint J.D./M.A. program are not required to complete the M.A. capstone project. The thesis-track is not open to students in the J.D./M.A. joint program without specific approval of the School of Communication. Students may take Summer law courses which may reduce the length of the joint degree program by up to one semester. Students may not take more than 16 credits each semester, excluding summer sessions. Seventeen credits per semester may be taken with permission from the Associate Dean, Academic Affairs, School of Law. 

MASTER OF FINE ARTS

Students must complete a minimum of 66 credit hours with the approval of the faculty advisor. Of the 66 credit hours, at least 24 must be at or above the 600-level and 12 credit hours at the 700-level must be earned for thesis work.

GENERAL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

1. All students in the Master of Arts (M.A.) program will complete the following core courses subject to specific requirements of each program.

a. Communication Studies and Public Relations

COM 601 Theories of Communication

COM 602 Methods of Communication Research and/or COM 603
Qualitative Research Methodologies

b. Journalism
COM 605 Theories and Methods for Mass Communication Research

2. With the approval of a faculty advisor, a student may take 6 to 15 credit hours in courses outside the School of Communication.

3. Candidates in thesis programs must have their thesis proposals formally approved by their thesis committee following a personal meeting with committee members. Candidates will be given final oral examinations in defense of their thesis.

4. Final (Capstone) Projects or written comprehensive examinations are required in some M.A. programs.

It is the responsibility of the student to apply for graduation either during registration for the final semester or before the date indicated on the Graduate School calendar and the Schedule of Classes. Students who previously applied for a diploma but did not receive the degree must repeat the application procedure. Graduation is based in the following:

a. Students must complete the minimum credits required for their area of study with a minimum GPA of 3.0.

b. Course substitutions will not apply toward graduation without the written approval of the program director of the area and the director of graduate studies.

c. Students are required to have the approval of the area program director and the director of graduate studies to take courses at another University.

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION STUDIES

COMMUNICATION STUDIES (M.A.)

Communication Studies Track

The goals of the Master of Arts program in Communication Studies are to provide students with a rigorous educational experience, to develop an advanced understanding of the human communication process, to increase awareness of the interdisciplinary nature of the communication field, and to develop oral, written, critical thinking, and research skills.  Students may complete coursework in persuasion, and interpersonal, intercultural, organizational, and health communication together with research methods applicable to these areas.

Two programs are offered. The thesis program emphasizes the student’s development of research skills under faculty supervision (30 credits). The non-thesis program focuses on a theoretical foundation with emphasis on applied communication (36 credits). Students will be prepared for leadership positions in public or private organizations at the national or international level, or pursue advanced degrees. Non-thesis students must complete a minimum of 36 credit hours at the graduate level with the approval of a faculty advisor or program director. Of the 36 credits, 18 credit hours must be at or above the 600 level.  No more than six hours will be allowed for advanced projects and directed research (599).

 

 

REQUIRED COMMUNICATION CORE: (Thesis/Non-Thesis Programs)      9 CREDITS

COM 601 Theories of Communication (3)
COM 602 Methods of Communication Research (3)
COM 603 Qualitative Research Methodologies (3)

ELECTIVES: (Thesis Program)         15 CREDITS
(Non-Thesis Program) 27 CREDITS

Students may select elective courses within the School of Communication or the University; a maximum of six (6) credits thesis track and nine (9) credits non-thesis track may come from outside the School of Communication. 

Recommended electives are:

COM 615 Social Effects of Mass Communication (3)
COM 672 Seminar in Persuasive Communication (3)
COS 545 Intercultural Communication: International Perspectives (3)
COS 546 Intercultural Communication: Domestic Perspectives (3)
COS 560 The Executive Communicator (3)
COS 591 Advanced Special Topics in Communication Studies (3)
COS 599 Advanced Projects and Directed Research (3)
COS 674 Seminar in Interpersonal Communication (3)
COS 682 Seminar in Organizational Communication (3)
COS 684 Organizational Communication Audit Procedures (3)
COS 690 Communication Studies Practicum (1-3)

THESIS COM 710 Master’s Thesis (Thesis Program) 6 CREDITS
TOTAL CREDITS (Thesis Program)         = 30 CREDITS
TOTAL CREDITS (Non-Thesis Program)     = 36 CREDITS

Health Communication Track

Health Communication is an emerging specialty in the field of communication. This graduate program is designed to provide a broad introduction to human communication in a health-care context. Career opportunities in this area include public health leaders, practitioners, and researchers who design, evaluate, and disseminate health communication messages for private and governmental organizations, advertising, public relations and marketing agencies, and journalists. Students will explore the roles of patients and caregivers, social and cultural issues, communication in health organizations, and the role of mass media. Two programs are offered. The thesis track program emphasizes the student’s development of research skills under faculty supervision (30 credits). The non-thesis track program emphasizes a theoretical foundation based on application of communication courses (36 credits).

REQUIRED COMMUNICATION CORE: (Thesis/Non-Thesis Programs)        9 CREDITS

COM 601   Theories of Communication (3)
COM 602   Methods of Communication Research (3)
COM 603   Qualitative Research Methodologies (3)

ELECTIVES: (Thesis Program)                 15 CREDITS
(Non-Thesis Program)         27 CREDITS

Students may select elective courses within the School of Communication or the University; a maximum of six (6) credits thesis track and nine (9) credits non-thesis track may come from outside the School of Communication. 

Recommended electives are:

COS 545 Intercultural Communication: International Perspectives (3)
COS 546 Intercultural Communication: Domestic Perspectives (3)
COS 591 Advanced Special Topics in Communication Studies: Seminar in Health Communication (3)
COS 599 Advanced Projects and Directed Research (3)
COS 674 Seminar in Interpersonal Communication (3)
COS 682 Seminar in Organizational Communication (3)
COS 690 Communication Studies Practicum (1-3)
COM 609 Special Topics (Social Change Communication Theory) (3)
COM 672 Seminar in Persuasive Communication (3)
HST 536 U.S. Health Care Crisis: Politics and Policies (3)
INS 570 Globalization and Health (3)
INS 670 Advanced Seminar in International Health (3)
NUR 550 Sociopolitical Dynamics of Health Issues (3)
SOC 632 Social Psychology of Health and Illness (3)
SOC 635 Medical Sociology: Issues in Research and Theory (3)
SOC 691 Special Topics and Current Issues in Medical Sociology (3)

THESIS COM 710   Master’s Thesis (Thesis Program)                 6 CREDITS
TOTAL CREDITS (Thesis Program)             = 30 CREDITS
TOTAL CREDITS (Non-Thesis Program)        = 36 CREDITS

Intercultural Communication Track

The Intercultural Communication Track is designed to provide students with an understanding of the way communication functions in intercultural settings, how culture affects the communication process, and the reciprocal effects of intercultural perceptions on policy in the history of Eastern-Western relations. Career opportunities in this field include corporate diversity trainer, communication director, human resource manager, international service representative, negotiator, and foreign correspondent with government and business organizations. Two programs are offered. The thesis track program emphasizes the student’s development of research skills under faculty supervision (30 credits). The non-thesis track program emphasizes a theoretical foundation based on application of communication courses (36 credits).

REQUIRED COMMUNICATION CORE: (Thesis/Non-Thesis Programs)        9 CREDITS
COM 601   Theories of Communication (3)
COM 602   Methods of Communication Research (3)
COM 603   Qualitative Research Methodologies (3)

ELECTIVES: (Thesis Program)                 15 CREDITS
(Non-Thesis Program)         27 CREDITS

Students may select elective courses within the School of Communication or the University; a maximum of six (6) credits thesis track and nine (9) credits non-thesis track may come from outside the School of Communication. 

Recommended electives are:

COS 545 Intercultural Communication: International Perspectives (3)
COS 546 Intercultural Communication: Domestic Perspectives (3)
COS 599 Advanced Projects and Directed Research (3)
COS 674 Seminar in Interpersonal Communication (3)
COS 682 Seminar in Organizational Communication (3)
COS 690 Communication Studies Practicum (1-3)
COM 609 Special Topics (Social Change Communication Theory) (3)
COM 672 Seminar in Persuasive Communication (3)
CNJ 510 Comparative Media Systems
INS 513 Information and Communication in International Relations (3)

THESIS COM 710   Master’s Thesis (Thesis Program)                 6 CREDITS
TOTAL CREDITS (Thesis Program)             = 30 CREDITS
TOTAL CREDITS (Non-Thesis Program)       = 36 CREDITS

DEPARTMENT OF STRATEGIC COMMUNICATION

PUBLIC RELATIONS (M.A.)

Public Relations - Thesis

This program includes a thesis. Students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours at the graduate level with the approval of a faculty advisor. Of the 30 credit hours, 15 credit hours must be at or above the 600 level. No more than six hours will be allowed for advanced projects and directed research (599). Six credit hours will be earned for thesis work.

REQUIRED COMMUNICATION AND PUBLIC RELATIONS CORE:   9 CREDITS

COM 601 Theories of Communication (3)
CPR 620   Public Relations Fundamentals (3)

Select one of the following courses:

COM 602 Methods of Communication Research (3) or
COM 603 Qualitative Research Methodologies (3)

PUBLIC RELATIONS SEQUENCE:   15 CREDITS

CPR 517 Media Relations (3)
CPR 582 International Public Relations (3)
CPR 584 Public Relations Management (3)
CPR 625   Seminar in Public Relations Administration (3)
CPR 629 Public Relations Seminar: Fundraising in the Not-for-Profit Sector (3)
CPR 632 Seminar in Public Relations and Political Campaigns (3)
CPR 633 Seminar in Public Relations: Lobbying and Pressure Groups (3)
CPR 634 Seminar in Public Relations: Non-profit Groups and Governmental Institutions (3)
CPR 644 Seminar in Public Relations Ethics (3)
COM 615 Social Effects of Mass Communication (3)

No comprehensive examinations are required for this degree.

THESIS COM 710   Master’s Thesis (Thesis Program)                 6 CREDITS
TOTAL CREDITS (Thesis Program)             = 30 CREDITS

Public Relations - Non-Thesis

Students who elect a program without a thesis must complete a minimum of 36 credit hours at the graduate level with the approval of the faculty advisor. Of the 36 credit hours, 18 must be at or above the 600 level.

REQUIRED COMMUNICATION AND PUBLIC RELATIONS CORE:   9 CREDITS

COM 601 Theories of Communication (3)
CPR 620 Public Relations Fundamentals (3)

Select one of the following courses:

COM 602 Methods of Communication Research (3) or
COM 603 Qualitative Research Methodologies (3)

PUBLIC RELATIONS SEQUENCE:   18 CREDITS

CPR 517 Media Relations (3)
CPR 582 International Public Relations (3)
CPR 584 Public Relations Management (3)
CPR 625 Seminar in Public Relations Administration (3)
CPR 629 Public Relations Seminar: Fundraising in the Not-for-Profit Sector (3)
CPR 632 Seminar in Public Relations and Political Campaigns (3)
CPR 633 Seminar in Public Relations: Lobbying and Pressure Groups (3)
CPR 634 Seminar in Public Relations: Non-profit Groups and Governmental Institutions (3)
CPR 644 Seminar in Public Relations Ethics (3)
COM 615 Social Effects of Mass Communication (3)
CPR 690 Public Relations Practicum I

ELECTIVES:     9 CREDITS

Nine credits must be taken outside the School of Communication’s Public Relations program, with approval of the program director.

No written comprehensive examinations are required for this degree.

COM 720 Continuous Registration – Research in Residence (0) (may be required for full time study)

TOTAL CREDITS (Non-Thesis Program)       = 36 CREDITS

DEPARTMENT OF JOURNALISM AND MEDIA MANAGEMENT

JOURNALISM (M.A.)

The Journalism program prepares students to work across different media platforms while also providing the opportunity to focus on particular areas of interest. The program emphasizes the timeless values and skills required to report news, commentary and features in a variety of formats, from newspapers and magazines to online journalism, television and radio. The program stresses analytical and critical thinking as well as effective storytelling in the context of today’s dynamic and evolving media landscape. In consultation with faculty advisors, students are strongly encouraged to develop areas of special interest while acquiring skills in a variety of media. During the first semester, all students take a core of courses that teach journalism from the print, online and broadcast perspectives. In later semesters, students will take additional core courses as well as electives and courses required within their chosen area of concentration.
From time-to-time and after consultation with a faculty adviser, students may take appropriate additional courses in other programs or schools. School of Communication journalism graduate students must complete a minimum of 36 credit hours at the graduate level with the approval of the Journalism graduate program director. Of the 36 credit hours, all must be at or above the 500 level, and 15 must be at or above the 600 level. Students with strong prior experience in a particular area may request a written waiver of a required course from their program director, upon the demonstration of sufficient expertise in that subject. All requirements and courses in the Journalism programs are subject to change as the faculty strives to keep the curriculum current with developments in the professional world and with new technologies and markets.
REQUIRED COMMUNICATION AND JOURNALISM CORE (All tracks):         21 CREDITS

COM 605 Theories and Methods of Communication (3)
CNJ 614 Media Law and Ethics Seminar (3)
CEM 592 The Business of Modern Journalism (3)
CEM 606 Writing and Reporting Across Platforms (3)
CVJ 521 Seminar in Visual Storytelling (3)
CVJ 522 Interaction Design and Information Visualization (3)
CVJ 530 Programming for Interactivity (3)

Electronic Journalism Track

Students who are interested in working in television and multimedia operations as reporters, producers, writers, directors, editors, programmers, designers, and researchers or students interested in working in information graphics, information visualization, and social media may choose to specialize in Electronic Journalism. Graduates of the broadcast and multimedia journalism program tracks have gone on to work for organizations such as CNN, CBS, NBC, ABC, ESPN, the New York Times, CNN.com, MSNBC.com, Telemundo, Associated Press, TIME, National Geographic as well as local stations across the country and numerous non-government organizations, nonprofits and universities. 
REQUIRED COURSES IN ADDITION TO THE CORE: 3 CREDITS
(only for those students pursuing a broadcast focus; others will complete an additional 3 credits of electives, listed below)


CEM 517 Television News Reporting

*Note:  This course is required for those students pursuing a television focus. 

ELECTIVES:       9 CREDITS

Students must complete three additional elective courses, chosen with the approval of a faculty advisor. These courses may come from either within or outside of the School of Communication. It is highly recommended that students consider pursuing a professional internship for one of these electives. Elective options include (but are not limited to):

CEM 527 Television Newscast (3)
CEM 599 Advanced Projects and Directed Research (3)
CEM 609 Internship in Electronic Media Journalism (3)
CEM 630 Topics in Electronic Communication (3)
CEM 725 Journalism Internship (3)
CNJ 510 Comparative Media Systems (3)
CNJ 513 Computer-Assisted Reporting (3)
CNJ 515 Reporting and the Internet (3)
CNJ 523 Sports Reporting (3)
CNJ 544 Feature Writing (3)
CVJ 531 Database Journalism (3)
CVJ 550 3D Design and Graphics (3)
CVJ 541 Advanced Audio Video Narratives (3)
CVJ 551   Advanced Programming (3)
CVJ 519   Interactive Storytelling (3)

FINAL CAPSTONE PROJECT: 3 CREDITS

Students, in consultation with program faculty, will complete a final reporting project that reflects in-depth knowledge and analysis of a subject and professional competence in reporting it for the appropriate medium.

TOTAL CREDITS = 36 CREDITS


News and Feature Writing Track
REQUIRED COURSES IN ADDITION TO THE CORE: 12 CREDITS
The News and Feature Writing track allows students the flexibility to design their own program based on their interests, with the advice and approval of a faculty advisor, who will develop a course plan with each student. Beyond the core courses, there are no required courses, though students must take at least 9 credits of the remaining 15 credits in courses that are writing and reporting intensive. Students may take up to a total of 6 credits in courses outside the School of Communication, in internships or as independent study projects, with the approval of a faculty advisor. An internship that involves intensive writing and reporting for a professional media organization and certain independent projects may under some circumstances count toward the required 9-credits of intensive writing and reporting.


Examples of electives (based on availability):
CNJ 510     Comparative Media Systems (3)
CNJ 511   Global Media (3)
CNJ 513     Computer-Assisted Reporting (3)
CNJ 515     Reporting and the Internet (3)
CNJ 523     Sports Reporting (3)
CNJ 544     Feature Writing (3)
CNJ 599     Advanced Projects and Directed Research (3)
CNJ 609   Graduate Internship in Journalism (3)
CNJ 617     International Journalism (3)
Summer study abroad courses in journalism writing or graphic design may be available. Check the summer schedule for details.

FINAL (CAPSTONE) PROJECT: 3 CREDITS
Students, in consultation with program faculty, will complete a final reporting project that reflects in-depth knowledge and analysis of a subject and professional competence in reporting it for the appropriate medium.
TOTAL CREDITS                                     = 36 CREDITS


Latin American Studies and Journalism Dual M.A. Degrees

Offered in the multi-cultural setting of Miami, a focal point for Caribbean Basin economic, political, immigration and communication flows, the School of Communication and College of Arts and Sciences have designed this joint degree program focusing on cross-cultural and international journalism. Students leave the university after four semesters and a summer with two M.A. degrees in hand, one in Journalism and the other in Latin American and Caribbean Studies. This specialized course of study is for students who wish to enter careers in journalism and communication specializing on the issues, economies, and peoples of Latin America and the Caribbean region. Sustainable economic development, immigration, social justice and human rights, the environment, international business, and U.S.-Latin American relations are just some of the areas in which students may specialize in an individually tailored course of study anchored by a core of fundamentals. Because this is a joint offering, 18 credits are shared between the two M.A. programs.

FIRST FALL SEMESTER REQUIRED COURSES (based on availability):   12 CREDITS

CEM 606 Writing and Reporting Across Platforms (3)
LAS 501 Interdisciplinarity in Latin American and Caribbean Studies (3)
CVJ 521 Visual Story Telling (3)
LAS 503 Program Seminar in Latin American Studies and Caribbean Studies (3)

FIRST SPRING SEMESTER REQUIRED COURSES (based on availability):        12 CREDITS

COM 605 Theories and Methods of Communication (3)
LAS 502 Interdisciplinary Research Methods (3)
CNJ 614 Media Law and Ethics Seminar (3)
LAS 503 Program Seminar in Latin American Studies and Caribbean Studies (3)

SUMMER SEMESTER REQUIRED COURSES (based on availability):   8 CREDITS

CEM 592 The Business of Modern Journalism (3)
LAS 505 Internship in Latin American and Caribbean Studies (5)

SECOND FALL SEMESTER REQUIRED COURSES (based on availability):   13 CREDITS

CVJ 530 Programming for Interactivity (3)
CVJ 522 Interaction Design and Information Visualization (3)
LAS 503 Program Seminar in Latin American Studies and Caribbean Studies (3)
Communication/Journalism Elective (3)
LAS 710 Pre-candidacy Thesis Credits (1)

SECOND SPRING SEMESTER REQUIRED COURSES (based on availability):   9 CREDITS

LAS 503 Program Seminar in Latin American Studies and Caribbean Studies (3)
Communication/Journalism Elective (3)
LAS 710 Pre-candidacy Thesis Credits (3)

TOTAL CREDITS (for the M.A. in Journalism)                      = 36 CREDITS

J.D./M.A. IN SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION

This program allows students to earn a J.D. and an M.A. in Communication in 3 to 3½ years. The three School of Communication programs participating in the joint J.D./M.A. program are Communication Studies, Public Relations, and Journalism. This joint degree program will allow 9 J.D. credits to be applied to the M.A. degree and 6 M.A. credits to be applied to the J.D. degree, saving the student 15 credits between the two programs.

LAW SCHOOL REQUIREMENTS:

Nine Law School credits should come from the following courses:

Administrative Law
Communications law
Constitutional Law II
Copyright Law
First amendment Law
Intellectual Property Law
Internet Law
Mass Media Law

Additional law courses to be considered (depending on the student’s particular area of interest) are:  Antitrust, Art and the Law, Bankruptcy Law, BA, Civil Procedure, Commercial Law, Consumer Law, Corporate Finance, Criminal Law, Cultural Property & Heritage, Elder Law, Election Law, Employment Law, Environmental Law, EU Law, Evidence, Family Law, Financial Regulation, Florida Con Law, Florida Criminal Procedure, Immigration Law, International Finance, International Human Rights, International Law, Latin American Law, Law & Economics, Law & Medicine, Legal Research Techniques, Media & the Law, Mortgage Law, National Security Law, Press Freedoms in the Americas, Public Education Law, Race and the Constitution, Securities Regulation, Sports Law, State & Local Government, Substantive Criminal Law, and Trademark Law.
The Law School will accept 6 credits from the following School of Communication courses:  (the courses selected will depend on the specific program, e.g., Journalism, Public Relations or Communication Studies, though following consultation with, and approval by, a faculty advisor, substitutions may be allowed)

COM 601 Theories of Communication (3)
COM 602 Methods of Communication Research (3)
COM 603 Qualitative Research Methodologies (3)
COM 605 Theories and Methods for Mass Communication Research (3)
CPR 620 Public Relations Fundamentals (3)
CNJ 611 Newswriting and Reporting Seminar (3) or
CEM 606 Writing and Reporting Across Platforms (3)
CEM 592 Special Topics in Electronic Media:  The Business of Modern Journalism (3)

COMMUNICATION STUDIES (M.A.):

This program has three tracks, each with 9 credits of required courses and 18 credits of elective courses (plus 9 credits that will be transferred from the School of Law).

Communication Studies Track

This program focuses on developing a theoretical foundation with emphasis on applied communication.

REQUIRED COMMUNICATION CORE: (Non-Thesis Program)              9 CREDITS

COM 601 Theories of Communication (3)
COM 602 Methods of Communication Research (3)
COM 603 Qualitative Research Methodologies (3)

ELECTIVES: (Non-Thesis Program)   27 CREDITS

COM 615 Social Effects of Mass Communication (3)
COM 672 Seminar in Persuasive Communication (3)
COS 545 Intercultural Communication: International Perspectives (3)
COS 546 Intercultural Communication: Domestic Perspectives (3)
COS 560 The Executive Communicator (3)
COS 591 Advanced Special Topics in Communication Studies (3)
COS 599 Advanced Projects and Directed Research (3)
COS 674 Seminar in Interpersonal Communication (3)
COS 682 Seminar in Organizational Communication (3)
COS 684 Organizational Communication Audit Procedures (3)

Health Communication Track

This program focuses on human communication in a health-care context.

REQUIRED COMMUNICATION CORE: (Non-Thesis Programs)              9 CREDITS

COM 601 Theories of Communication (3)
COM 602 Methods of Communication Research (3)
COM 603 Qualitative Research Methodologies (3)
ELECTIVES: (Non-Thesis Program)         27 CREDITS

COS 545 Intercultural Communication: International Perspectives (3)
COS 546 Intercultural Communication: Domestic Perspectives (3)
COS 591 Advanced Special Topics in Communication Studies: Seminar in Health
Communication (3)
COS 599 Advanced Projects and Directed Research (3)
COS 674 Seminar in Interpersonal Communication (3)
COS 682 Seminar in Organizational Communication (3)
COM 609 Special Topics (Social Change Communication Theory) (3)
COM 672 Seminar in Persuasive Communication (3)
HST 536 U.S. Health Care Crisis: Politics and Policies (3)
INS 570 Globalization and Health (3)
INS 670 Advanced Seminar in International Health (3)
NUR 550 Sociopolitical Dynamics of Health Issues (3)
SOC 632 Social Psychology of Health Illness (3)
SOC 635 Medical Sociology: Issues in Research and Theory (3)
SOC 691 Special Topics and Current Issues in Medical Sociology (3)

Intercultural Communication Track

This program focuses on the way communication functions in intercultural settings, how culture affects the communication process, and the reciprocal effects of intercultural perceptions on policy in the history of East-West relations. 

REQUIRED COMMUNICATION CORE: (Non-Thesis Program)              9 CREDITS

COM 601 Theories of Communication (3)
COM 602 Methods of Communication Research (3)
COM 603 Qualitative Research Methodologies (3)

ELECTIVES: (Non-Thesis Program)            27 CREDITS

COS 545 Intercultural Communication: International Perspectives (3)
COS 546 Intercultural Communication: Domestic Perspectives (3)
COS 599 Advanced Projects and Directed Research (3)
COS 674 Seminar in Interpersonal Communication (3)
COS 682 Seminar in Organizational Communication (3)
COM 609 Special Topics (Social Change Communication Theory) (3)
COM 672 Seminar in Persuasive Communication (3)
CNJ 510 Comparative Media Systems(3)
INS 513 Information and Communication in International Relations (3)

PUBLIC RELATIONS (M.A. – NON-THESIS)

This program is focused on public relations with 9 credits of required courses and 18 credits of elective courses (plus 9 credits that will be transferred from the School of Law.)

REQUIRED COMMUNICATION AND PUBLIC RELATIONS CORE:   9 CREDITS

COM 601 Theories of Communication (3)
CPR 620   Public Relations Fundamentals (3)
Select one of the following courses:

COM 602 Methods of Communication Research (3) or
COM 603 Qualitative Research Methodologies (3)

The 18 elective credits can be selected from the following courses:

CPR 517 Media Relations (3)
CPR 582 International Public Relations (3)
CPR 584 Public Relations Management (3)
CPR 625 Seminar in Public Relations Administration (3)
CPR 629 Public Relations Seminar: Fundraising in the Not-for-Profit Sector (3)
CPR 632 Seminar in Public Relations and Political Campaigns (3)
CPR 633 Seminar in Public Relations: Lobbying and Pressure Groups (3)
CPR 634 Seminar in Public Relations: Non-profit Groups and Governmental Institutions (3)
CPR 644 Seminar in Public Relations Ethics (3)
COM 615 Social Effects of Mass Communication (3)

JOURNALISM (M.A.)

The program in journalism has 18 credits of required courses and 9 credits of elective courses (plus 9 credits that will be transferred from the School of Law).  Law students with particular areas of interest may consult with a faculty advisor in Journalism to request course substitutions.

REQUIRED COMMUNICATION AND JOURNALISM CORE:   18 CREDITS

COM 605 Theories and Methods of Communication (3)
CEM 592 The Business of Modern Journalism (3)
CEM 606 Writing and Reporting Across Platforms (3)
CVJ 521 Seminar in Visual Storytelling (3)
CVJ 522 Interaction Design and Information Visualization (3)
CVJ 530 Programming for Interactivity (3)

ELECTIVE OPTIONS:         9 CREDITS

CEM 517 Television News Reporting (3)
CEM 527 Television Newscast (3)
CEM 599 Advanced Projects and Directed Research (3)
CEM 609 Internship in Electronic Media Journalism (3)
CEM 630 Topics in Electronic Communication (3)
CEM 725 Journalism Internship (3)
CNJ 510 Comparative Media Systems (3)
CNJ 511 Global Media (3)
CNJ 513 Computer-Assisted Reporting (3)
CNJ 515 Reporting and the Internet (3)
CNJ 523 Sports Reporting (3)
CNJ 544 Feature Writing (3)
CNJ 599 Advanced Projects and Directed Research (3)
CNJ 609 Graduate Internship in Journalism (3)
CNJ 617 International Journalism (3)
CVJ 519 Interactive Storytelling (3)
CVJ 531 Database Journalism (3)
CVJ 550 3D Design and Graphics (3)
CVJ 551 Advanced Programming (3)
CVJ 541 Advanced Audio Video Narratives (3)
CVJ 649 Team Multimedia Project (3)

TOTAL CREDITS           = 36 CREDITS

NOTE: The requirements and electives within each track are subject to change.

DEPARTMENT OF CINEMA AND INTERACTIVE MEDIA

MOTION PICTURES (M.F.A.)

Students must complete a minimum of 66 credit hours with the approval of the faculty advisor. Of the 66 credit hours, at least 24 must be at or above the 600-level, and 12 credit hours at the 700-level must be earned for thesis work.

M.F.A. candidates are expected to follow a set sequence of courses during the first two semesters of their studies. During the second year of studies, candidates are strongly encouraged to explore not only a primary but also a secondary area of specialization in the program and develop a minimum of two creative projects consistent with their areas of primary interest and secondary specialization. A minimum of 6 credits hours in each area of specialization is required. Under faculty committee supervision, students will develop one or two creative projects in the third year of their studies.

All M.F.A. students must demonstrate deeper, critical understanding of motion picture practice in diverse social and cultural contexts.  To this purpose, and during their first year of studies, students are expected to produce a short motion picture project abroad. Students are also encouraged to participate in an internship during the summer of the first year or second year of studies.

This three-year program culminates with a thesis portfolio that demonstrates, not only skillful execution of craft, but strong conceptual development rooted in collaborative work and innovative uses of technology.

FIRST YEAR:

REQUIRED FALL SEMESTER COURSE WORK: 12 CREDITS

CMP 501 Principles of Aesthetics & Analysis (3)
CMP 510 Foundations of Screenwriting (3)
CMP 520 Cinematography (3)
CMP 560 Directing the Actor (3)

REQUIRED SPRING SEMESTER COURSE WORK: 12 CREDITS

CMP 530 Introduction to Editing (3)
CMP 511 Writing the Short Script (3)
CMP 570 Producing the Motion Picture (3)
CMP 550 Production Workshop I - Narrative (3)

SECOND YEAR:

FALL SEMESTER COURSE OFFERINGS: 12 CREDITS

CMP 650 Production Workshop II – Individual Projects (3)
CMP 610 Writing the Feature-length Screenplay (3)
CMP 612 Writing for Episodic Television (3)
CMP 670 The Business of Motion Pictures (3)
CMP 660 Directing Performance and Creative Collaboration (3)
CMP 603 Film Directors (3)

SPRING SEMESTER COURSE OFFERINGS: 12 CREDITS

CMP 611 Re-Writing the Feature Screenplay (3)
CMP 653 Documentary Production (3)
CMP 661 Directing the Camera (3)
CMP 640 Sound Design (3)
CMP 630 Advanced Editing (3)
CMP 607 National Cinemas (3)

THIRD YEAR:

RECOMMENDED FALL SEMESTER COURSE WORK: 9 CREDITS

CMP 715 MFA THESIS (6)
CMP 613 Advanced Writing for Episodic Television (3)
CMP 671 Production Management (3)

RECOMMENDED SPRING SEMESTER COURSE WORK: 9 CREDITS

CMP 715 MFA THESIS (6)
CMP 672 Marketing and Distribution (3)

No more than nine credit hours will be allowed for graduate internships and advanced projects and directed research. Courses may be taken, with program director approval, from other programs or departments within the University of Miami.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN COMMUNICATION

Students will not be admitted to the doctoral program until they have earned a master’s degree in communication or in another appropriate field.

Students must complete 57 credits of course work beyond the master’s degree. Twenty-four credits must be in courses at the 600-level. No transfer credits may count toward these 24 credits, and 12 of the 57 credits must be dissertation credits.
REQUIRED CORE COURSES:   21 CREDITS

COM 601 Theories of Communication (3)
COM 602 Methods of Communication Research (3)
COM 603 Qualitative Research Methodologies (3)
COM 604 Advanced Communication Research Methods (3)
COM 609 Special Topics in Communication (3)
COM 698 Doctoral Seminars (3)
Students must take a total of 9 credits in COM 609 and /or COM 698 or any combination of the two.

School of Communication Electives       9-12 CREDITS

Courses outside the School of Communication       12-15 CREDITS

Examinations

All School of Communication Ph.D. students will be given written and oral qualifying examinations following the conclusion of all course work prior to being admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. A majority of the examination committee must be members of the Graduate Faculty of the University. A failure to pass the qualifying exams will require the student to retake the exams and pass them within one calendar year. Any student who fails to be admitted to candidacy for the degree within this one-year period will be dismissed from the program.

Dissertation

Students must complete 12 dissertation credits. Students must proceed with the dissertation after the dissertation committee has been appointed and the dissertation proposal has been approved by the committee and accepted by the director of graduate studies and the Graduate School. The dissertation must be an investigation of a substantial scholarly topic. A final oral defense of the dissertation is required.

Requirements for Candidacy

Admission to Candidacy is based on:

a. GPA of at least 3.0
b. Approval from program director
c. Successful completion of qualifying examinations