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Law & Politics
Sawgrass
Mary Doyle, professor of Law, School of Law and co-director of the Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy
Office: (305) 284-2986
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Professor Doyle was deputy general counsel of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency during the administration of President Jimmy Carter. In addition, she served as acting Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Water and Science and as chair of an intergovernmental panel, coordinating the massive 20-year $7.3 billion Everglades restoration program.

Geology, Hydrology & Remote Sensing

Tim Dixon, Ph.D., professor in the Marine Geology and Geophysics Division of the Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science
Office: (305) 421-4660
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Dr. Dixon’s research includes crustal deformation, plate motion and remote sensing in the Everglades. He can discuss the geology of the Everglades and changes that have occurred due to development.

Terri Hood, Ph.D., lecturer of Geology and assistant director of the Ecosystem Science and Policy (ESC) undergraduate program
Office: (305) 972-6203
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Dr. Hood’s research interests include chemical processes occurring in coastal sediments and development of new methods in electron microscopy. Her research in the last decade has focused on deciphering human impacts in coastal environments using sediment records. Dr. Hood's particular areas of study have included the Everglades/Florida Bay ecosystem and the Mississippi River outflow region in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

Helena Solo-Gabriele, Ph.D, P.E., professor of Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering
Office: 305-284-3489
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Dr. Gabriele’s research relates to water flows within the Everglades watershed. This research is tied to public health and restoration given that the Everglades serves as the ultimate source of drinking water for large urban communities. Her most recent research project involves documenting the importance of water flow to landscape structure and sediment transport in Everglades National Park. Her lab characterizes the suspended sediment to model ecosystem function.

John Wang, Ph.D., professor in Applied Marine Physics and Ocean Engineering, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
Office: (305) 421-4648
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Dr. Wang specializes in hydrology, mass transport and circulation patterns in estuaries and coastal areas. He develops numerical models for wetlands and aquatic habitats. He is available to discuss hydrology and wetland protection in the Everglades.

Shimon Wdowinski, Ph.D., research associate professor, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
Office: (305) 421-4730
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Dr. Wdowinski studies wetland hydrology and remote sensing in relation to the Everglades watershed.

Economics of Restoration

Richard Weisskoff, Ph.D., associate professor of economics in the Department of International Studies
Office: (305) 284-6864
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Dr. Weisskoff is an environmental economic. He recently authored the book, The Economics of Everglades Restoration: Missing Pieces in the Future of South Florida.

Biology & Environmental Quality

Larry Brand
Larry Brand, Ph.D., professor of Marine Biology and Fisheries, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
Office: (305) 421-4138
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Dr. Brand studies the interaction of ecological and evolutionary processes in marine phytoplankton, how fast and to what extent phytoplankton populations and species are able to adapt to their local environments. Over a hundred species isolated from different areas of the ocean, representing all the major phylogenetic groups of algae, are maintained in the laboratory. His field research addresses environmental quality as it relates to nutrient transport from the Everglades to Florida Bay.

Harold Wanless, Ph.D., professor and chair of the department of geological sciences, College of Arts and Sciences\
Phone: (305) 284-4258
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Dr. Wanless can talk about the hydrology and geological history of the Everglades as well as the human effects on coastal and shallow marine environments. He can discuss environmental policy as it refers to the Everglades restoration project.

Daniel Wang, Ph.D., lecturer of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences
Office: (305) 284-4181
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Dr. Wang studies the pineland communities associated with the Florida Everglades ecosystem. South Florida slash pines are endemic to south Florida and historically covered approximately 180,000 acres in southeast Florida in presettlement times. Due to encroaching development and damage from Hurricane Andrew, only 1% of the pine forests remain. In collaboration with the Department of Environmental Resource Management (DERM) of Miami-Dade County, Dr. Wang has initiated a study of the genetic structure of South Florida slash pine populations using polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers. Their study will provide much needed information to maximize the probability that reforestation efforts utilize genetically diverse stocks and prioritize the efforts aimed at protecting remaining pine rockland.

Jack W. Fell, Ph.D., professor of Marine Biology and Fisheries, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
Office: (305) 421-4603
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Dr. Fell’s researches the role of fungi in marine food webs. His near shore field studies concentrate on the role of fungi in decomposition processes in the mangrove detrital system, a major nutrient source in tropical food webs. This research has important implications to determine the overall health of the Everglades wetland ecosystem.

Donald DeAngelis, Ph.D., adjunct professor of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences
305) 284-1690
Dr. DeAngelis is a theoretical ecologist with an interest in population dynamics, age and size structure of populations, food web theory, ecosystem theory, nutrient cycling, modeling of animal behavior and movement, evolutionary theory, forest dynamics, and global climate change. He is currently working as part of a group to develop a landscape level model of the Everglades ecosystem.

Michael Gaines, Ph.D., professor of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences
Office: (305) 284-5058
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Dr. Gaines studies the effect of habitat fragmentation on small mammal populations. He is currently studying the effects of habitat fragmentation on small mammal populations on hammock islands in the Florida Everglades, genetic variation in the silver rice rat (Oryzomys argentatus) in the Florida Keys, and the population dynamics of the endangered Key Largo woodrat, Neotoma floridana smalli.

Leonel Sternberg, Ph.D., professor of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences
Office: (305) 284-6436
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Dr. Sternberg researches the ecophysiology of plants from several ecosystems in the Everglades including the hardwood hammocks and mangrove species. His lab has also studies another important ecosystem issue in South Florida is the presence of invasive exotics such as Brazilian Pepper and Australian Pine. Current research seeks to address the requirement for an abundant water supply found in the Everglades. Dr. Helena Gabriele's laboratory in conjunction with his laboratory used stable isotope tracers to determine whether wellfields at the edge of the Everglades National Park are indeed tapping water from the Everglades.